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I have

jQuery(document).ready(function() 
{

    jQuery.get('data/php/traces_pos.csv', function(data) { var routes = jQuery.csv()(data); });

//if I use here 

for (i=0;i<=routes.length;i++){}

// javascript says route undefined

}

How do I access the routes which is a array of arrays

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to wait until routes has been set. I'm using a function and passing in routes as a parameter:

jQuery(document).ready(function() 
{

    jQuery.get('data/php/traces_pos.csv', function(data) {  
        var routes = jQuery.csv()(data); 
        performRoutes(routes);
    });
});

//if I use here 
function performRoutes(routes) {
    for (i=0;i<=routes.length;i++){
        // routes
    }
}
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Moving the declaration of routes outside the jQuery.get call will make it visible to your for loop -- but beware that your for loop runs before the callback is called, so routes will not have been set yet.

Anything you do that depends on the result of an asynchronous get must be either inside the callback function or in code that is called from within the callback function. In the latter case, you can pass your routes as a parameter at the function call -- there is no need to widen the variable's scope.

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cant I just wait till the callback is finished? Otherwise my whole program which is dependent on routes will end up being in the jquery.get –  user494461 Aug 29 '11 at 21:20
1  
The way to wait until the callback is called is to do your work inside the callback. That's what it's for. There's no good cross-browser supported way to block the thread until something happens in JavaScript. (Doing so would be likely to halt the entire JS engine). –  Henning Makholm Aug 29 '11 at 21:22

You have to define routes outside of either function, as such:

var routes;

jQuery(document).ready(function() 
{

    jQuery.get('data/php/traces_pos.csv', function(data) {  routes = jQuery.csv()(data); });

//if I use here 

for (i=0;i<=routes.length;i++){}

//  routes is no longer undefined

}
share|improve this answer
    
after doing that I get cannot read property length of 'undefined' in y browser –  user494461 Aug 29 '11 at 21:11
    
You want the length of undefined? –  m.edmondson Aug 29 '11 at 21:12
    
I am getting that error for this line - for (i=0;i<=routes.length;i++){} –  user494461 Aug 29 '11 at 21:13
    
You need to make sure routes is getting set correctly. –  m.edmondson Aug 29 '11 at 21:14
    
yes it is. I get an array of arrays in firebug when I do console.log. But does that mean that it really doesnt have a property called length? –  user494461 Aug 29 '11 at 21:16

Define routes outside the callback:

var routes;
jQuery.get('data/php/traces_pos.csv', function(data) { routes = jQuery.csv()(data); });
share|improve this answer
    
Won't help because the callback has not yet run when the OP tries to use the variable. –  Henning Makholm Aug 29 '11 at 21:18

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