Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it correct code?

my $ttt = eval {
 my @a=(1,2);
 return \@a;
};

print @$ttt[1]. "\n";

I thought, that eval block is evaluated on fly and not exists after execution. Are there any minuses in that decision?

share|improve this question
3  
What's the question? What are you expecting and what happened that didn't match your expectation. –  Jim Garrison Aug 29 '11 at 22:27
    
eval block is compiling and running on fly, I am afraid than array will be destroyed by garbage collector –  Nickolay Stavrogin Aug 29 '11 at 22:31
    
It is not compiling and running on the fly. That is very incorrect. This is the form of eval that is pronounced [traɪ]. And garbage collection will only kick in when refcount hits zero. –  tchrist Aug 29 '11 at 22:36
    
ah, no it won't be destroyed so long as a reference still exists. And if your code is in a loop or a subroutine and is executed a second time, my @a will be allocated a new array not associated with the one previously returned. –  ysth Aug 29 '11 at 22:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The eval block remains part of the code in memory. Is that what you are trying to avoid? If so, this isn't the right way to do it and you should explain more the underlying problem you are trying to solve.

The code will run, but you are using an array slice in the print where you probably intend to use a simple array dereference:

print $$ttt[1]. "\n";

You also aren't checking to see if the eval succeeded; the following proceeds to the print and then (if you have warnings enabled) gives a Use of uninitialized value warning:

my $ttt = eval {
    die "horribly";
    my @a=(1,2);
    return \@a;
};

print @$ttt[1]. "\n";
share|improve this answer

The eval block is parsed with the rest of the code and its return value is a reference to the array @a. That reference is assigned to $ttt. While the eval block goes out of scope, @a still has a non-zero reference count (thanks to $ttt) so it still exists.

share|improve this answer

Your use of eval is useless and you don't check the result, but I have a feeling what you're trying to grasp has really nothing to do with eval, but when variables are freed.

Perl uses reference counting to know when it's safe to free a variable. A variable is freed as soon as nothing references it. In addition to references, lexical (my) variables are also referenced by the scope in which they are created, and package variables are also referenced by the package in which they reside.

Under "normal" circumstances, a variable will be destroyed on scope exit as the only reference to it gets removed*. Scopes are created by many things including the curlies of subs and eval. Here's an example:

use feature qw( say );

{ package D; DESTROY { say "Destroyed $_[0]"; } }

{
    my $x = bless({}, 'D');   # $x's refcnt is 1.
    say "Before scope exit";
}                             # $x's refcnt drops to 0, so it's freed.
say "After scope exit";

Output:

Before scope exit
Destroyed D=HASH(0x8eff768)
After scope exit

Now, what if you stored a reference to $x outside of the scope in which $x resides?

use feature qw( say );

{ package D; DESTROY { say "Destroyed $_[0]"; } }

my $ref;
{
    my $x = bless({}, 'D');   # $x's refcnt is 1.
    $ref = \$x;               # $x's refcnt is 2.
    say "Before scope exit";
}                             # $x's refcnt drops to 1, so it's not freed.
say "After scope exit";
$ref = undef;                 # $x's refcnt drops to 0, so it's freed.
say "After clearing reference";

Output:

Before scope exit
After scope exit
Destroyed D=HASH(0x8cc4768)
After clearing reference

In your code, the returned reference to @a keeps @a alive even after the scope that created it is exited. This can be verified by printing $ttt, and then @$ttt.

ARRAY(0x99464b8)
1 2

If you were to enter the block multiple times, you get references to different variables because my allocates a new variable each time*. Compare

my @a;
for (1..2) {
    my $x = $_;
    push @a, \$x;
}
say $a[0];  # 1

with

my @a;
my $x;
for (1..2) {
    $x = $_;
    push @a, \$x;
}
say $a[0];  # 2

* — Implementation varies from this explanation, but it's an optimisation that's not suppose to have visible side-effects.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.