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When coding C# I often find myself implementing immutable types. I always end up writing quite a lot of code and I am wondering whether there is a faster way to achieve it.

What I normally write:

public struct MyType
{
  private Int32 _value;
  public Int32 Value { get { return _value;} }

  public MyType(Int32 val)
  {
     _value = val;
  }
}

MyType alpha = new MyType(42);

This gets fairly complicated when the number of fields grows and it is a lot of typing. Is there a more efficient way for doing this?

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which version of c#? –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '11 at 23:02
2  
You should also mark the _value field as readonly. Also, is there a particular reason why you are using a struct instead of a class? –  adrianbanks Aug 29 '11 at 23:06
    
@adrianbanks: no specific reason. It's just that in most cases I'm more interested in the values, rather than in behaviour –  yas4891 Aug 29 '11 at 23:07
    
@yas4891: in that case, make sure you read Choosing between classes and structures. –  adrianbanks Aug 29 '11 at 23:08
1  
This can be driven to extremes that ultimately end up not actually getting the job done. The point of writing a program is to mutate state. If you don't, you can never figure out when you're done and never actually accomplish anything. Sure, don't mutate a struct. Mutating a class object is progress, never hesitate to accomplish that. –  Hans Passant Aug 29 '11 at 23:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The only way I can suggest of writing less code is to use something like ReSharper to auto-generate the code for you. If you start with something like:

public class MyType
{
    private int _value;
}

you can then generate "read-only properties" to give:

public class MyType
{
    private int _value;
    public int Value{get {return _value;}}
}

followed by generate constructor to give:

public class MyType
{
    private int _value;
    public int Value{get {return _value;}}

    public MyType(int value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }
}

The generation steps are 8 key presses in total.


If you really want an unmodifiable immutable class, I would declare it as such:

public sealed class MyType
{
    public int Value{get {return _value;}}
    private readonly int _value;

    public MyType(int value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }
}

This makes the class non-derivable (meaning that a sub-class cannot modify its inner state), and the _value property assignable only during construction. Unfortunately, ReSharper doesn't have code generation for this pattern, so you would still have to construct (most of) it manually.

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2  
+1 for making the class sealed. Immutable classes designed for inheritance make no sense at all. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 29 '11 at 23:19
    
I've accepted this answer because it made the type sealed and the value readonly. –  yas4891 Aug 31 '11 at 12:29
1  
Immutability and inheritance are not mutually exclusive, especially when dealing with polymorphism. As an example, see the System.Linq.Expressions namespace. –  rossipedia Jul 10 '12 at 7:27

You could simplify it a little with automatic properties and a private setter as below:

public struct MyType
{  
  public Int32 Value { get; private set; }

  public MyType(Int32 val)
  {
     Value = val;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This prevents the use of readonly, though - while the OP didn't have that, it would help to enforce the immutability constraint. –  Reed Copsey Aug 29 '11 at 23:09
1  
That's a bit of an academic consideration in my opinion. –  Ben Robinson Aug 29 '11 at 23:17
1  
In a larger class, over time, it's very difficult to prevent another developer from calling your setter... Even a non-readonly backing field does not make it obvious that the intent is to be immutable. While there's no true immutable types in C#, making it readonly and having no setter definitely makes the intent much more clear. –  Reed Copsey Aug 29 '11 at 23:20
1  
I guess I'm used to being the boss - the developer in question doing that without justification wouldn't be a developer around here for long ;) –  Reed Copsey Aug 29 '11 at 23:37
1  
Sounds like you need to find a better boss ;) –  Reed Copsey Aug 30 '11 at 16:04

Code snippets at the rescue! Save this xml as "immutable.snippet", then go to Visual Studio, select Tools, Code Snippets Manager and import it. That's it! Now write "immutable" and hit TAB twice and you have your immutable type.

The actual code in the snippet is based on @adrianbanks answer.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<CodeSnippets xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
  <CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0">
    <Header>
      <SnippetTypes>
        <SnippetType>Expansion</SnippetType>
      </SnippetTypes>
      <Title>Immutable type (C#)</Title>
      <Author>Alfonso Cora</Author>
      <Description>Creates an immutable type</Description>
      <HelpUrl>http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7236977/how-to-efficiently-implement-immutable-types</HelpUrl>
      <Shortcut>immutable</Shortcut>
    </Header>
    <Snippet>
      <Declarations>
        <Literal Editable="true">
          <ID>type</ID>
          <ToolTip>The type on which this immutable type is based.</ToolTip>
          <Default>int</Default>
          <Function>
          </Function>
        </Literal>
        <Literal Editable="true">
          <ID>class</ID>
          <ToolTip>The name of the immutable type.</ToolTip>
          <Default>MyImmutableType</Default>
          <Function>
          </Function>
        </Literal>
      </Declarations>
      <Code Language="csharp"><![CDATA[public sealed class $class$
{
    public $type$ Value{get {return _value;}}
    private readonly $type$ _value;

    public $class$($type$ value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }
}]]></Code>
    </Snippet>
  </CodeSnippet>
</CodeSnippets>
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