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I am currently working on a project where I am attempting to hide as much detail about a hierarchy I have created as possible. I want to do this to minimize the amount of information the user needs to know about objects (and to control what they can do to the state of the object). In addition, I'm using the pattern to limit what kinds of objects the application can make, and limit it to creation from the factory.

The main issue I am having, however, is that there are a few different kinds of interfaces I would like to expose. Each interface is has additional functionality that I don't believe should be shared, and I would like to keep these interfaces separated. Finally, I don't know what new interfaces may come in the future, but I'd like to try and be ready for them.

Weapon:

public interface Weapon extends GameObject {
    Number attack();

    boolean addWeaponAttribute(WeaponAttribute attribute);
}

Firearm:

public interface Firearm extends Weapon {
    void reload(Number rounds);
}

My question is what would be the best way to have the factory produce objects with different interfaces? Here's what I am thinking "the best would be":

  1. The most clear to the user (it's obvious what they're asking for and what they're getting back)
  2. The best for future expansion (I am uncertain what new interfaces I will be adding to this system).

Here's what I have been thinking so far:

Create properly named methods for each interface

public static Firearm getFirearm(String firearmName) {
    ...
}

public static Weapon getWeapon(String weaponName) {
    ...
}

Do the above, but produce the factories in separately named classes

public class WeaponFactory {
    public static Weapon getWeapon(String weaponName) {
        ...
    }
}


public class FirearmFactory {    
    public static Firearm getFirearm(String firearmName) {
        ...
    }
}

Something completely different

I'm open to suggestions, and changes. This is a flexible project, so I can change as much as I want to (in terms of this portion of the project) to make a better result.

Also - As a side note, I was uncertain if this question was too open-ended or not for SO. If I made a mistake posting here, let me know and I'll move my question elsewhere.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks everyone for adding your suggestions! I think they're all valid ways of solving this issue. My solution most aligned with Ray Tayek's answer, so that's what I went with for the accepted answer. –  Doug Swain Oct 2 '11 at 22:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

maybe just use the factory method design pattern like

interface GameObject {}
class WeaponAttribute {}
interface Weapon extends GameObject {
    Number attack();
    boolean addWeaponAttribute(WeaponAttribute attribute);
}
interface Firearm extends Weapon {
    void reload(Number rounds);
}
class WeaponBaseClass implements Weapon {
    WeaponBaseClass(WeaponName weaponName) {
        this.weaponName=weaponName;
    }
    @Override public Number attack() {
        return null;
    }
    @Override public boolean addWeaponAttribute(WeaponAttribute attribute) {
        return false;
    }
    public String toString() {
        return weaponName.toString();
    }
    final WeaponName weaponName;
}
class FirearmBaseClass extends WeaponBaseClass implements Firearm {
    public FirearmBaseClass(WeaponName weaponName) {
        super(weaponName);
    }
    @Override public void reload(Number rounds) {}
}
enum WeaponName {
    knife, sword, colt45, glock19, glock19WithLaser;
}
class WeaponCreator {
    Weapon create(WeaponName weaponName) {
        switch (weaponName) {
            case knife:
            case sword:
                return new WeaponBaseClass(weaponName);
            case colt45:
            case glock19:
                return new FirearmBaseClass(weaponName);
            default:
                return new WeaponBaseClass(weaponName);
        }
    }
}
class FancyWeaponCreator extends WeaponCreator {
    Weapon create(WeaponName weaponName) {
        Weapon weapon = null;
        switch (weaponName) {
            case glock19WithLaser:
                weapon = super.create(WeaponName.glock19);
                // whatever it needs
                return weapon;
            default:
                return new WeaponBaseClass(weaponName);
        }
    }
}
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new WeaponCreator().create(WeaponName.knife));
        System.out.println(new WeaponCreator().create(WeaponName.colt45));
        System.out.println(new FancyWeaponCreator().create(WeaponName.glock19WithLaser));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Seems like an interesting way to do it. The issue I have with it is that I don't know how the user will see different methods of Firearm versus another interface type without casting. –  Doug Swain Aug 30 '11 at 22:49
    
yes, you will need different interfaces and you may have to use instanceOf to check the type. –  Ray Tayek Oct 6 '11 at 0:19

What I can suggest is to make the interfaces as concise as possible and move other unrelated methods elsewhere. you might consider doing this for example:

public interface Weapon extends GameObject {
    Number attack();
}

public interface Modifiable extends GameObject {
    boolean addWeaponAttribute(WeaponAttribute attribute);
}

public class ActualWeapon implements Weapon, Modifiable {
...
}

Then you can create different factories to generate your concrete objects, as you already mentioned:

public class WeaponFactory {
    public static Weapon getWeapon(String weaponName) {
        ...
    }
}

or

public class GenericFactory<T extends GameObject> {
    public T createGameObject(Object... properties) {
        ...
    }
}
public class WeaponFactory extends GenericFactory<ActualWeapon> {
    public ActualWeapon createGameObject(Object... properties) {
        ...
    }
}

I think you can't add static methods to interfaces. I wouldn't recommend it if you even could.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree - Even if possible, I won't add static methods to interfaces since it doesn't seem very clean. I like this technique a lot! Seems flexible enough and easy enough to understand for the user. –  Doug Swain Aug 30 '11 at 22:47

What about a factory of factories? Each factory would implement ifactory. Ifacorty would require a method Instantiate(string type) and return your subclassed weapon instance.

share|improve this answer
    
Really this is a strategy pattern. –  Josh C. Aug 30 '11 at 0:31
    
So would that mean that the user is forced to cast the returned objects into the expected type? I guess another goal would be to avoid the user having to do things such as that, but maybe that's the way to go... –  Doug Swain Aug 30 '11 at 0:33
    
The returned type could be an interface. You would completely forego concrete types and use an abstract type instead. This would remove the need for casting, and if your abstract type is an interface, you won't have to worry about inheritance impacting your method logic. –  Josh C. Aug 30 '11 at 0:40
    
As @elevine said, generics is also a good way to go. The factory method GetObject would no longer contain your factory logic. I am thinking that logic would be moved back to the T class so the internals of that method would look like T.Create(name). The only problem with this is having multiple different builds of the same class. For instance, your firearm could be a hand gun, rifle, etc. A separate firearm factory with a CreateHandGun, CreateMachineGun, etc. is a lot cleaner. Of course, the interfaced method call from your factory could handle distributing that logic. –  Josh C. Aug 30 '11 at 1:03
    
Seeing the code example of using generics is helpful along with different factories for different interface types. –  Doug Swain Aug 30 '11 at 22:50

Using generics, you might only need one factory method like:

public <T> T getObject(java.lang.Class<T> responseType, String name)

Then the user would call:

Weapon weapon = factory.getObject(Weapon.class, "my weapon");
share|improve this answer
    
Can this technique be used on interfaces? It makes sense that it could be, but I am not 100% positive. –  Doug Swain Aug 30 '11 at 22:46
1  
Are you asking: If Weapon is an interface, can Weapon.class be passed as an argument to this function? The answer to that is yes. However, in the function body, you will have to figure out which implementation of method to instantiate an return. –  elevine Aug 30 '11 at 23:27
    
That was my question! I kinda assumed I would have to do some work to resolve what version to instantiate. Thanks. –  Doug Swain Aug 31 '11 at 0:21

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