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I want to call a main controller function that dispatches other function dynamically, something like this:

package Controller;

my %callback_funcs = ();

sub register_callback{
   my ($class,$callback,$options) = _@;
   #apppend to %callback_funcs hash ... ?
}

sub main{
%callback_funcs = ( add => 'add_func', rem => 'remove_func', edit => 'edit_func');  
  while(<STDIN>){
     last if ($_ =~ /^\s*$/);
     if($_ == 'add' || _$ == 'rem' || _$ == 'edit'){
        $result = ${callback_funcs['add']['func']}(callback_funcs['add']['options']);
     }
  }
}

sub add_func{
...
}

One caveat is that the subs are defined in other Modules, so the callbacks would have to be able to reference them... plus I'm having a hard time getting the hashes right!

share|improve this question
6  
First things first: use strict and use warnings. –  FMc Aug 30 '11 at 1:37
    
good tip! thank you! –  qodeninja Aug 30 '11 at 1:50
    
callback_funcs is a hash, but callback_funcs['add']['func'] doesn't look anything like a hash lookup. The sigil is missing, and the wrong brackets are used. –  ikegami Aug 30 '11 at 2:01
3  
$_ == 'add' performs a numerical comparison. 'add' doesn't really produce a number. This is buggy. You want $_ eq 'add'. –  ikegami Aug 30 '11 at 2:02
1  
If you want more, take a look at Higher order perl.. Free online: hop.perl.plover.com/book Just started it, looks great. –  Øyvind Skaar Aug 30 '11 at 10:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

So, it's possible to have a hash that contains anonymous subroutines that you can invoke from stdin.

my %callbacks = (
    add => sub {
        # do stuff
    },
    fuzzerbligh => sub {
        # other stuff
    },
);

And you can insert more hashvalues into the hash:

$callbacks{next} = sub {
    ...
};

And you would invoke one like this

$callbacks{next}->(@args);

Or

my $coderef = $callbacks{next};
$coderef->(@args);

You can get the hashkey from STDIN, or anywhere else.

You can also define them nonymously and then take a reference to them.

sub delete {
    # regular sub definition
}

$callbacks{delete} = \&delete;

I wouldn't call these callbacks, however. Callbacks are subs that get called after another subroutine has returned.

Your code is also rife with syntax errors which may be obscuring the deeper issues here. It's also not clear to me what you're trying to do with the second level of arrays. When are you defining these subs, and who is using them when, and for what?

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5  
They are called dispatch tables. –  Alan Haggai Alavi Aug 30 '11 at 1:35
    
Thank you for the tips, I was just trying to wrap my head around the whole thing... ill clean up and come back for more! -- but what if the subroutine for the callback is loaded/exported from an external Module? –  qodeninja Aug 30 '11 at 1:51
    
awesome reference @Alan –  qodeninja Aug 30 '11 at 1:52
2  
Re "you're missing an arrow in your example", no that arrow is optional. perl -wE"$x{f}=sub{ say 'hi' }; $x{f}()" –  ikegami Aug 30 '11 at 1:55
1  
@codeninja Take a reference to it using the last way in my example $callback{delete} = \&External::Module::delete_me; –  masonk Aug 30 '11 at 1:58

Perhaps this simplified example will help:

# Very important.
use strict;
use warnings;

# Define some functions.
sub multiply { $_[0] * $_[1] }
sub divide   { $_[0] / $_[1] }
sub add      { $_[0] + $_[1] }
sub subtract { $_[0] - $_[1] }

# Create a hash of references to those functions (dispatch table).
my %funcs = (
    multiply => \&multiply,
    divide   => \&divide,
    add      => \&add,
    subtract => \&subtract,
);

# Register some more functions.
sub register {
    my ($key, $func) = @_;
    $funcs{$key} = $func;
}

register('+', \&add);    # As above.
register('sum', sub {    # Or using an anonymous subroutine.
    my $s = 0;
    $s += $_ for @_;
    return $s;
});

# Invoke them dynamically.
while (<>){
    my ($op, @args) = split;
    last unless $op and exists $funcs{$op}; # No need for equality tests.
    print $funcs{$op}->(@args), "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
does this also work when the subs are coming from other Modules? –  qodeninja Aug 30 '11 at 3:01
    
@codeninja Sure. –  FMc Aug 30 '11 at 3:14

You've already got some good answers on how to build a dispatch table and call functions through it within a single file, but you also keep talking about wanting the functions to be defined in other modules. If that's the case, then wouldn't it be better to build the dispatch table dynamically based on what dispatchable functions each module says it has rather than having to worry about keeping it up to date manually? Of course it would!

Demonstrating this requires multiple files, of course, and I'm using Module::Pluggable from CPAN to find the modules which provide the function definitions.

dispatch_core.pl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %dispatch;

use lib '.'; # a demo is easier if I can put modules in the same directory
use Module::Pluggable require => 1, search_path => 'DTable';
for my $plugin (plugins) {
    %dispatch = (%dispatch, $plugin->dispatchable);
}

for my $func (sort keys %dispatch) {
    print "$func:\n";
    $dispatch{$func}->(2, 5);
}

DTable/Add.pm:

package DTable::Add;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub dispatchable {
    return (add => \&add);
}

sub add {
    my ($num1, $num2) = @_;
    print "$num1 + $num2 = ", $num1 + $num2, "\n";
}

1;

DTable/MultDiv.pm:

package DTable::MultDiv;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub dispatchable {
    return (multiply => \&multiply, divide => \&divide);
}

sub multiply {
    my ($num1, $num2) = @_;
    print "$num1 * $num2 = ", $num1 * $num2, "\n";
}

sub divide {
    my ($num1, $num2) = @_;
    print "$num1 / $num2 = ", $num1 / $num2, "\n";
}

1;

Then, on the command line:

$ ./dispatch_core.pl 
add:
2 + 5 = 7
divide:
2 / 5 = 0.4
multiply:
2 * 5 = 10

Adding new functions is now as simple as dropping a new file into the DTable directory with an appropriate dispatchable sub. No need to ever touch dispatch_core.pl just to add a new function again.

Edit: In response to the comment's question about whether this can be done without Module::Pluggable, here's a modified dispatch_core.pl which doesn't use any external modules other than the ones defining the dispatchable functions:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %dispatch;

my @dtable = qw(
  DTable::Add
  DTable::MultDiv
);

use lib '.';
for my $plugin (@dtable) { 
    eval "use $plugin";
    %dispatch = (%dispatch, $plugin->dispatchable);
}   

for my $func (sort keys %dispatch) {
    print "$func:\n";
    $dispatch{$func}->(2, 5);
}   
share|improve this answer
    
this is a marvelous example, I like how you used dispatchable as an interface function for the Dispatch Table -- really awesome. I wonder if there is a way to do this without the additional Module. It sounds like id have to export the subs I want to dispatch from other modules, do you agree? –  qodeninja Aug 30 '11 at 16:33
    
As you can see, you don't need to export when doing it this way, since the subs are referenced by name only from within their own packages. Module::Pluggable is one of a few modules which provide "search for all packages within this namespace" functionality, but you need to use one of them unless you want to manually maintain a list in the main script of modules to load dispatchable functions from. (Or you could copy the module-locating function into your own code, of course, but you may as well just use M::P (or whatever) at that point...) –  Dave Sherohman Aug 31 '11 at 7:54

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