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Ok, I have a simple question here... but I can't seem to find the differrence.

Here's the script (named test.sh):

#! /bin/bash
printf "%b\n" "\u5A"

When the script is sourced:

. test.sh
> Z         ## Result I want ##

When the script is run:

./test.sh
> \u5A      ## Result I get ##

I want the run script to give the results of the sourced script... what setting do I need to set/change?

Aesthir

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What I'm looking for is some environment variable (eg. export LANG=en_CA.UTF-8), emacs setting (eg. set output-meta on), set/shopt option (eg. shopt -s xpg_echo). etc... to make the script translate like printf's %b should do. Instead it prints it out as if I had used %s. –  Aesthir Aug 30 '11 at 3:49

8 Answers 8

Shouldn't you be using \x instead of \u? printf "%b\n" "\x5A" works fine in both cases for me.

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+1, note that \u expects an unsigned decimal, but 5A is hex. –  Foo Bah Aug 30 '11 at 3:02
1  
I have a script containing long lists of unicode characters that I want to have printed on the terminal properly. I can't use UTF-8 (\xE2\x88\x9E...) for each multi-byte character instead of \u2221E. I simply used \u5A as an example, but \u50 is fine too. I want the script to translate it, not spit it back at me. If you're running OSX, then open the Character Viewer in the input menu... every value for unicode is a hex value. U+221E (for instance, for infinity) I have always worked with hex since day 1 using \u within many scripts... it has always taken a hex value normally for me. –  Aesthir Aug 30 '11 at 4:07
    
In any case, this answer doesn't explain why sourcing the script and running the script gave different results. That's the real oddity here. –  Tom Zych Aug 30 '11 at 8:49
    
Turns out I've been using bash 4, which does accept hex for \u... I've never known older versions do not like hex but it turns out any version below 4 craps out with \uHEX –  Aesthir Sep 11 '11 at 11:24

You are probably getting different versions of printf; the script you are sourcing from is probably a /bin/sh script, not a Bash script proper?

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Verrrry close tripleee!! Turns out I had 2 different versions of bash running... I posted the answer. +1 anyway for the idea! –  Aesthir Sep 1 '11 at 6:13

(Totally different idea here, so I'm posting it as another answer.)

Try running these at the command line:

builtin printf "%b\n" "\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "%b\n" "\u5A"

printf is both a shell builtin and an executable, and you may be getting different ones depending on whether you source or run the script. To find out, insert this in the script and run it each way:

type printf

While you're at it, you may as well insert this line too:

echo $SHELL

That will reveal if you're getting different shells, per tripleee.

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Thanks Tom for the help! Focusing of printf is sooo close to the answer... turns out 2 different bash versions... +1 for all the help (and research) –  Aesthir Sep 1 '11 at 6:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

HAHA!!! I finally traced down the problem! Read ahead if interested leave the page if not.

These are the only command that will translate \u properly:

. ./test.sh                         ## Sourcing the script, hash-bang = #! /bin/sh
. ./test.bash                       ## Sourcing the script, hash-bang = #! /bin/bash
./test                              ## Running the script with no hash-bang

All of the following produce identical results in that they do NOT translate \u:

./test.sh                           ## Script is run from an interactive shell but in a non-interactive shell

## test.sh has first line: #! /bin/sh
/bin/sh -c "./test.sh"              ## Running the script in a non-interactive sh shell
/bin/sh -lc "./test.sh"             ## Running the script in a non-interactive, login sh shell
/bin/sh -c ". ./test.sh"            ## Sourcing the file in a non-interactive sh shell
/bin/sh -lc ". ./test.sh"           ## Sourcing the file in a non-interactive, login sh shell

## test.bash has first line: #! /bin/bash
/bin/bash -c "./test.bash"          ## Running the script in a non-interactive bash shell
/bin/bash -lc "./test.bash"         ## Running the script in a non-interactive, login bash shell
/bin/bash -c ". ./test.bash"        ## Sourcing the file in a non-interactive bash shell
/bin/bash -lc ". ./test.bash"       ## Sourcing the file in a non-interactive, login bash shell

## And from ***tripleee*** (thanks btw):
/bin/sh --norc; . ./test.sh         ## Sourcing from an interactive sh shell without the ~/.bashrc file read
/bin/bash --norc; . ./test.bash     ## Sourcing from an interactive bash shell without the ~/.bashrc file read

The only way to get proper translation is to run the script without a hash-bang... and I finally figured out why! Without a hash-bang my system chooses the default shell, which btw is NOT /bin/bash... it turns out to be /opt/local/bin/bash... two different versions of bash!

Finally, I removed the OSX /bin/bash [v3.2.48(1)] and replaced it with the MacPorts /opt/local/bin/bash [v4.2.10(2)] and now running the script works! It actually solved about 10-15 other problems I've had (like ${var,,}, read sN1 char, complete -EC "echo ' '", and a host of other commands I have scattered throughout my scripts, ~/.bashrc amd ~/.profile). Honestly, I really should have noticed when my scripts using associative arrays suddenly crapped out on me... how stupid can I get!?

I've been using bash v4 for a looong time now, and my Lion upgrade went and down-graded bash back to v3 (get with the program Apple!)... ugh, I feel so ashamed! Everyone still using bash v3, upgrade!! bash v4 is has many, many beautiful upgrades over version 3. Type bash --version to see what version you are running. One advantage is now bash can translate \uHEX into Unicode!

Thanks for the help all!

Aesthir

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Try removing the space in the first line, I seem to recall that can cause problems. Offhand I'd guess that because of that space, you're not getting bash, but sh.

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The space is there on purpose so as "\u5A" is an argument to printf. I get the same results with printf $'\u5A' and printf "\u5A" and echo -e "\u5A" and echo $'\u5A' ... all of which have removed the space. –  Aesthir Aug 30 '11 at 3:39
    
He means the space before /bin/bash. See also my answer. –  tripleee Aug 30 '11 at 4:19
1  
@tripleee is correct: I was saying the shebang should be #!/bin/bash, without a space. I thought I had read somewhere that the space cuased some kind of problem. I just spent some time googling and I can't find anything about that, so I'm probably wrong. Still, it's worth a try and doesn't do any harm. –  Tom Zych Aug 30 '11 at 8:47
    
Well, I tried it and got the exact same results... however, you may have inadvertently stumbled on the problem. By removing the hash-bang line altogether, the problem is fixed! I tried changing it to #! /bin/sh, #!/bin/sh, #! /bin/bash, and #!/bin/bash, no differences. –  Aesthir Aug 31 '11 at 3:48
    
Anyone know why this strange behaviour is happening? No hash-banger and boom! Everything works! –  Aesthir Sep 1 '11 at 1:33

test.bash

﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈
Tom Zych and tripleee: You two are hitting on the same idea, which makes a lot of sense . To address all these questions, I've tried what you two have asked me to attempt and wrote up a new tester script but changed the extension to match the shell running the script. So here is the new test.bash:

#! /bin/bash

printf " [1] %b\n" "\u5A"
printf " [2] %b\n" "\x5A"

builtin printf " [3] %b\n" "\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4a] %b\n" "\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4b] %b\n" "\\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4c] %b\n" "\\\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4d] %b\n" "\\\\u5A"

echo -n ' [5] '; type printf
echo -n ' [6] '; echo $SHELL

echo -n ' [7] '; which -a printf

... and the results:

./test.bash
>  [1] \u5A
>  [2] Z
>  [3] \u5A
> [4a] u5A
> [4b] u5A
> [4c] \u5A
> [4d] \u5A
>  [5] printf is a shell builtin
>  [6] /bin/bash
>  [7] /usr/bin/printf

. ./test.bash
>  [1] Z
>  [2] Z
>  [3] Z
> [4a] u5A
> [4b] u5A
> [4c] \u5A
> [4d] \u5A
>  [5] printf is a shell builtin
>  [6] /bin/bash
>  [7] /usr/bin/printf

Note: I get the exact same results whether a space is present or not present after the exclamation mark in the hash-bang.


test.sh

﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈﹈
I'm using OSX 10.7 (Lion), but all versions of OSX substitute /bin/bash whenever /bin/sh is launched. I don't remember if sh is hard-linked or sym-linked to bash, or simply a launcher program for bash... but bash is the default shell for OSX regardless... If I try to log in using /bin/sh -l, then echo $SHELL, I get /bin/bash. However, the results below are the results I would get with sh.

In spite of this, to address your previous post, Tom Zych, I changed the hash-bang and run the script with /bin/sh. Here's the sh-banger test.sh script:

#! /bin/sh

printf " [1] %b\n" "\u5A"
printf " [2] %b\n" "\x5A"

builtin printf " [3] %b\n" "\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4a] %b\n" "\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4b] %b\n" "\\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4c] %b\n" "\\\u5A"
/usr/bin/env printf "[4d] %b\n" "\\\\u5A"

echo -n ' [5] '; type printf
echo -n ' [6] '; echo $SHELL

echo -n ' [7] '; which -a printf

And the results when run from sh (required for the sourced run) are as follows:

/bin/sh -c "./test.sh"
>  [1] \u5A
>  [2] Z
>  [3] \u5A
> [4a] u5A
> [4b] u5A
> [4c] \u5A
> [4d] \u5A
> -n  [5]
> printf is a shell builtin
> -n  [6]
> /bin/bash         ## <—— Still "bash" even though the results look like "sh" output
> -n  [7]
> /usr/bin/printf

  /bin/sh -c "source ./test.sh"
>  [1] \u5A         ## Since nothing now gets translated, I'm going to assume ...
>  [2] Z            ## ... you 2 (Tom & tripleee) are correct, running a script is ...
>  [3] \u5A         ## ... being done with some whacked form of 'sh' that's able ...
> [4a] u5A          ## ... to behave like bash in every case except for this unicode ...
> [4b] u5A          ## ... translation with $'\u5A'
> [4c] \u5A
> [4d] \u5A
> -n  [5]
> printf is a shell builtin
> -n  [6]
> /bin/bash         ## <—— Still "bash" even though the results look like "sh" output
> -n  [7]
> /usr/bin/printf

So using a little trick I noticed a long time ago, the su command logs me in to sh:

su -l
>     〔Password〕
./test.sh
>  [1] \u5A
>  [2] Z
>  [3] \u5A
> [4a] u5A
> [4b] u5A
> [4c] \u5A
> [4d] \u5A
> -n  [5]
> printf is a shell builtin
> -n  [6]
> /bin/sh               ## <—— Yay!
> -n  [7]

. ./test.sh
>  [1] \u5A
>  [2] Z
>  [3] \u5A
> [4a] u5A
> [4b] u5A
> [4c] \u5A
> [4d] \u5A
> -n  [5]
> printf is a shell builtin
> -n  [6]
> /bin/sh               ## <—— Yay!
> -n  [7]
> /usr/bin/printf

Note: I get the exact same results whether a space is present or not present after the exclamation mark in the hash-bang.


Soooo... now that all my information is on the table... it looks like sh is having trouble with \u5A, and it also looks like ALL my programs are being run with some form of sh that mimicks bash exactly (in every way, including being able to do things that sh cannot normally do whereas bash can), except for one case: the translation of unicode through \u.

Seems a bit ridiculous but that's the conclusion I'm being led to with the above evidence... anyone have another answer to what you see above? any other ideas? I need this problem solved to write a script as using the \x5A simply wouldn't work without tripling (at least) the amount of code, and it would be incredible challenging to boot.

BTW, since I'm being asked to make these changes, and run these commands, am I to assume nobody else has this problem with their shells? I figured it was universal with certain settings.... but I guess not.

Aesthir

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1  
The value of $SHELL only tells you the value of $SHELL, not which shell you are actually running. echo $0 should tell you which shell you are currently running. Bash changes its behavior when it is invoked under the name sh to be more Bourne-like, which might account for the difference in output. The Bash manual page details the changes when running in Bourne-compatible mode, aka POSIX mode. This does not appear to affect the behavior of the built-in printf but I may be missing something here: gnu.org/s/bash/manual/bash.html#Bash-POSIX-Mode –  tripleee Aug 31 '11 at 6:47
    
My proposal at this point would be to replace the calls to printf with calls to a portable function of your own which groks your \uNNNN syntax. Is this a feasible approach? –  tripleee Aug 31 '11 at 6:50
1  
Do you see differences in the output from shopt between your login shell (i.e. source) and a noninteractive shell started from the command line (i.e. script case)? I'm currently looking mainly at the extquote option. –  tripleee Aug 31 '11 at 6:54
    
... although extquote in particular doesn't seem to be the culprit after all. But I suspect something in your .bashrc is changing an option or something. Do you see consistent behavior if you start an interactive shell with --norc? –  tripleee Aug 31 '11 at 6:59
    
Wow, thanks tripleee! lots to test here, I'll get back to you soon... –  Aesthir Sep 1 '11 at 1:31

Thanks triplee! Your Perl code is interesting, but I don't know how to incorporate it into my script... so here it is (just a shorty):

declare -- BaseDir='/Users/aesthir/Programming/Shell/MacRoman Translator'
declare -- MacRoman="$BaseDir/Western MacOS Roman.txt" Translator="$BaseDir/MacOS Roman —> UTF-8 Translator.log"
pushd "$BaseDir"

printf 'Translator Table:\r\r' >|"$Translator"
declare -i i=32; until (( i > 1024*1024 )) ; do
    X="$(printf "%X\n" $i)"
    Y="$(echo "${X#0X}")"
    eval echo -e '\\u'"$Y" >"$MacRoman"
    A="$(printf "%-8s\t\t%-8b\t%s\n" "$(cat "$MacRoman" | iconv -f 'MACROMAN' -t 'UTF-8')" "\u$Y" '\\u'"$Y")"
    echo "$A" >>"$Translator"
    (( i++ )) && printf "\r" >>"$Translator"
done

This generates a list of Unicode characters (from the hex values, of course) along with the MacRoman translations on the same line so that another portion of the script can take the required lines of this list and create a dynamic sed script to translate a document containing improperly-translated MacRoman text back into the original Unicode.

This works now, but unfortunately it only works in bash version 4+. Incorporating your code may make it more versatile... but I'm pretty useless when it comes to Perl.

Aesthir

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Glad you solved it. Still, you might be looking for a portable solution.

Assuming you are always using the same formatting string, we can just discard it, and use something like this;

printf () {
  # Discard format string
  shift
  perl -CSD -le '
    print map { s/^\\u//; chr(hex($_)) } @ARGV' "$@"
}

Edit to add: You would simply add this function definition at the beginning of your existing script, overriding the builtin printf. Obviously, if you also use printf for other stuff, this special-purpose replacement isn't good enough.

You could rename the function to uprintf or something, still. It merely translates a sequence of hex codes to the corresponding Unicode characters, discarding any \u prefix.

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