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I am being given input in the form of:

(8,7,15)
(0,0,1) (0,3,2) (0,6,3)
(1,0,4) (1,1,5)
(2,1,6) (2,2,7) (2,5,8)
(3,0,9) (3,3,10) (3,4,11) (3,5,12)
(4,1,13) (4,4,14)
(7,6,15)

where I have to remember the amount of triples there are. I wrote a quick testing program to try read the input from cin and then split string up to get the numbers out of the input. The program doesn't seem to read all the lines, it stops after (1,1,5) and prints out a random 7 afterwards

I created this quick testing function for one of the functions I am trying to create for my assignment:

int main ()
{
  string line;
  char * parse;

  while (getline(cin, line)) {

    char * writable = new char[line.size() + 1];
    copy (line.begin(), line.end(), writable);
    parse = strtok (writable," (,)");

    while (parse != NULL)
    {
      cout << parse << endl;
      parse = strtok (NULL," (,)");
      cout << parse << endl;
      parse = strtok (NULL," (,)");
      cout << parse << endl;
      parse = strtok (NULL," (,)");
    }

  }
  return 0;
}

Can someone help me fix my code or give me a working sample?

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Have you tried running it under a debugger to find the exact line where it segfaults? –  unkulunkulu Aug 30 '11 at 4:35
    
Cannot reproduce: ideone.com/k9ZAb –  Kay Aug 30 '11 at 4:36
    
@kay it does not seg fault anymore, but there is still a problem here that is making my output incorrect –  SNpn Aug 30 '11 at 4:39
    
All you have to do is count the triples? If you know that's the only format there is (i.e. there's not going to be anything but triples in that file) then you can just count the opening parentheses ( –  Seth Carnegie Aug 30 '11 at 4:44
1  
I know I'm being knit-picky, but you can just convert a string to a char * with the c_str() method of string. Less bug prone. –  JackMc Aug 30 '11 at 5:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use this simple function:

istream& read3(int& a, int& b, int& c, istream& stream = cin) {
    stream.ignore(INT_MAX, '(');
    stream >> a;
    stream.ignore(INT_MAX, ',');
    stream >> b;
    stream.ignore(INT_MAX, ',');
    stream >> c;
    stream.ignore(INT_MAX, ')');

    return stream;
 }

It expects the stream to start at a (, so it skips any characters and stops after the first ( it sees. It reads in an int into a which is passed by reference (so the outside a is affected by this) and then reads up to and skips the first comma it sees. Wash, rinse, repeat. Then after reading the third int in, it skips the closing ), so it is ready to do it again.

It also returns an istream& which has operator bool overloaded to return false when the stream is at its end, which is what breaks the while loop in the example.

You use it like this:

// don't forget the appropriate headers...
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

int a, b, c;

while (read3(a, b, c)) {
    cout << a << ' ' << b << ' ' << c << endl;
}

That prints:

8 7 15
0 0 1
0 3 2
0 6 3
1 0 4
1 1 5
2 1 6
2 2 7
2 5 8
3 0 9
3 3 10
3 4 11
3 5 12
4 1 13
4 4 14
7 6 15

When you give it your input.

Because this is an assignment, I leave it to you to add error handling, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
what would be a good way to read how many triples per line? –  SNpn Aug 30 '11 at 5:48
    
@snpn you could do that many ways. One way would be to use std::getline to read a line and count the # of (, then wrap the line in a stringstream and do the read3 on that. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 30 '11 at 7:18

I've written a blog 9 days back exactly to parse such inputs:

And you can see the output here for your input : http://ideone.com/qr4DA

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