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I am cutting my teeth at some template programming and I am very new to this. What I want to implement are a few CRTP classes that contain an STL container. Let class A{}; serve as an example for the (compile time) base class from which class B{}; and class C{}; are "derived" at compile time following the CRTP style.

Now both B and C will contain containers. For the purpose of the example let it be a std::vector and a std::set respectively. Now, I want to expose the iterators of these via a begin() and an end() function that exposes a forward iterator. However, I do not want to expose what is the exact container that is inside B and C and I want to define these functions for A, so that at call time the correct one for B and C get used.

Is this possible ? Right now my plan is to have a Iterator inner class for B as well as C that will contain the actual iterator of (a vector or a set as the case may be) and delegate the call to it. However this seems to be a lot of replicated glue code and I suspect there is a better option.

I have a couple of questions:

  1. How do I declare the inner clases in A, B and C so that it plays well with CRTP. Do I need to replicate it for A, B and C ? Can it be an empty class in A and I mask them in B and C with specialized implementations ?

  2. How can I expose the iterator with less glue and less duplication ?

I do not want to create dependencies with external libraries like boost and want to stick to std only. So I have to implement whatever extra I need myself. Thanks for all the help.

share|improve this question
    
I assume you want begin() and end() to be virtual functions in class A right? –  Seth Carnegie Aug 30 '11 at 5:12
    
@Seth Carnegie No thats the thing I do not want this classes to have any virtual function at all. –  san Aug 30 '11 at 5:19
1  
yeah, there's a problem because you're returning a type which is defined in the derived class. There's no way to do this that I know of (because that type doesn't exist when you derive from the base class using CRTP so you get a compile error about the type not being defined) except to use covariance by returning a reference or a pointer, in which case you have to have the memory allocated somewhere else, which ruins the whole thing with iterators. You'll notice that the wikipedia article on CRTP returns void for all the examples. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 30 '11 at 5:37
1  
You can see my question on this here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6977820/… while it doesn't deal with CRTP, one of the answers presents that as a solution but it can't work for the same reason you're having here. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 30 '11 at 5:40
1  
no, because the type has to exist when you derive it. That means you can't declare any types inside your class and use them as a template parameter because by the time you define it, its too late. Unless of course the type you're meaning is not a nested class in the derived class. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 30 '11 at 7:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understood you corretcly, you are looking for something like this. Note, I made some simple constructor just to illustrate that it works. Also, your class A is mine class TWrapperBase, B - TWrapperB, C - TWrapperC. Another thing, you don't really need to have two derived classes for this particular example, but I assume your classes B and C are significantly different to justify it in your program.

EDIT: Forgot to increment lIterSet in the loop.

#include <vector>
#include <set>
#include <iostream>

template< typename PType, typename PContainer >
class TWrapperBase
{
 public:
  typedef PType TType;
  typedef PContainer TContainer;
  typedef typename TContainer::iterator TIterator;
 protected:
  TContainer mContainer;
 public:
  TWrapperBase( const TContainer& pOriginal ) :
   mContainer( pOriginal )
  {
  }
  TIterator begin( void )
  {
   return mContainer.begin();
  }
  TIterator end( void )
  {
   return mContainer.end();
  }
};

template< typename PType, class PContainer = std::vector< PType > >
class TWrapperB : public TWrapperBase< PType, PContainer >
{
 public:
  TWrapperB( const TContainer& pOriginal ) :
   TWrapperBase( pOriginal )
  {
  }
};

template< typename PType, class PContainer = std::set< PType > >
class TWrapperC : public TWrapperBase< PType, PContainer >
{
 public:
  TWrapperC( const TContainer& pOriginal ) :
   TWrapperBase( pOriginal )
  {
  }
};

int main( void )
{
 int lInit[] =
 {
 1, 2, 3
 };

 std::vector< int > lVec( lInit, lInit + 3 );
 std::set< int > lSet( lInit, lInit + 3 );

 TWrapperB< int > lB( lVec );
 TWrapperC< int > lC( lSet );

 std::vector< int >::iterator lIterVec = lB.begin();
 std::set< int >::iterator lIterSet = lC.begin();

 while( lIterVec < lB.end() )
 {
  std::cout << "vector: " << *lIterVec << " / set: " << *lIterSet << std::endl;
  lIterVec++;    
  lIterSet++;
 }

 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ideally would not like to expose the nature of the container type outside, but this is a good alternative solution. Wish I could accept more than 2 answers. –  san Aug 30 '11 at 19:20

Expose the iterator too via CRTP:

template <typename T, typename Iter, typename ConstIter>
struct Base
{
    Iter begin() { return static_cast<T*>(this)->begin(); }
    Iter end() { return static_cast<T*>(this)->end(); }
    ConstIter begin() const { return static_cast<const T*>(this)->begin(); }
    ConstIter end() const { return static_cast<const T*>(this)->end(); }
};


struct B : Base<B, std::vector<int>::iterator, std::vector<int>::const_iterator>
{
    std::vector<int>::iterator begin() { return container.begin(); }
    ...

private:
    std::vector<int> container;
};

If you have more types to expose, then pass a traits class as a template argument to Base:

template <typename T, typename Traits>
struct Base
{
    typename Traits::iterator begin() { ... }
    ...
};

// For this purpose, vector<int> makes a perfect traits class !
struct B : Base<B, std::vector<int> >
{
    std::vector<int>::iterator begin() { ... }
    ...
};

// Here is an example function taking Base as argument
template <typename T, typename Traits>
void foo(const Base<T, Traits>& x) 
{
    typename Traits::iterator i = x.begin();
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, this exactly what I have (i.e. begin and end CRTP'ed too). My problem was how to declare the iterator as they were actually of different types in the different derived classes, but traits and/or template does solve the problem. Thank you. –  san Aug 30 '11 at 19:12

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