Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider these examples:

static int a;
extern int a; //OK -- what linkage does the a have now?

static int a;
int a; //ERROR

extern int a;
static int a; //ERROR

int a;
static int a; //ERROR

extern int a;
int a; //OK as expected

int a;
extern int a; //OK as expected

Why it was OK in the first example but not in the second?

As far as file-scope variables (global-scope) are concerned, these have external linkage and a static duration when no keyword is specified.

Thank you

AFAIK, linkage and storage duration for functions is a bit different.

EDIT: I've tried compiling using gcc 4.5.2 -Wall -pedantic --std=c99

More on: http://c-faq.com/decl/static.jd.html You can see that the 1st example works there too but 2nd doesn't. However, I don't see what makes them so different.

share|improve this question
    
Can you ellobrate more on your questions? because in the very first care you commented OK but that produces an error saying "static declaration of ‘a’ follows non-static declaration" –  user919065 Aug 30 '11 at 5:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer to your first question is found in §6.2.2 of the C standard:

4 For an identifier declared with the storage-class specifier extern in a scope in which a prior declaration of that identifier is visible, if the prior declaration specifies internal or external linkage, the linkage of the identifier at the later declaration is the same as the linkage specified at the prior declaration. If no prior declaration is visible, or if the prior declaration specifies no linkage, then the identifier has external linkage.

So the linkage of a is internal.

For your second question, the second sentence of the immediately following paragraph is apropos:

5 If the declaration of an identifier for a function has no storage-class specifier, its linkage is determined exactly as if it were declared with the storage-class specifier extern. If the declaration of an identifier for an object has file scope and no storage-class specifier, its linkage is external.

Because a is an object, not a function, the declaration int a; with no storage-class specifier gives a external linkage. The same section then has this to say:

7 If, within a translation unit, the same identifier appears with both internal and external linkage, the behavior is undefined.

Since, in your second example, a appears with both internal and external linkage, this paragraph is triggered. One (particularly helpful) manifestation of undefined behaviour is the error that your compiler is producing.

All of your examples can be understood by these rules:

  1. int a; always declares a with external linkage;
  2. static int a; always declares a with internal linkage;
  3. extern int a; declares a with whatever linkage it already had, or external linkage if it had none;
  4. Two declarations of a in the same scope with different linkage give undefined behaviour.
share|improve this answer
    
I wonder, what is the rationale behind external inheriting linkage? As for me, it only makes confusion. –  mindless Aug 30 '11 at 6:15
    
"if the prior declaration specifies internal or external linkage". Does this mean it should be explicitly specified or that it can also be implicitly determined like it was mentioned in your second paragraph: "If the declaration of an identifier for a function has no storage-class specifier, its linkage is determined exactly as if it were declared with the storage-class specifier extern". –  mindless Aug 30 '11 at 6:25
    
@mindless: I don't think it matters - that is the int a; extern int a; case. Either the extern int a; declaration has external linkage because the int a; declaration has external linkage, or it has external linkage because the int a; declaration (directly) specified no linkage - no matter what interpretation you use, the result is the same. By the way, the first sentence you have quoted of paragraph 5 is specifically about functions. –  caf Aug 30 '11 at 6:47
    
It probably a problem with me and my comprehension of English or everything in general, but considering this case: { int a; extern int a; } how could standard be interpreted. I might open another question so I could understand ambiguities. Just now I understood that keyword and linkage is not the same (function example). It gives keyword but does not mention final linkage. –  mindless Aug 30 '11 at 6:54
    
@mindless: In the case of int a; extern int a; (at file scope) both declarations of a have external linkage - I don't see what the problem is. –  caf Aug 30 '11 at 7:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.