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I have around 500 text files inside a directory with a same prefix in their filename say dailyReport_.

The latter part of the file is the date of the file. (For eg. dailyReport_08262011.txt, dailyReport_08232011.txt)

I want to delete these files using a Java procedure (I could go for a shell script and add it a job in the crontab but the application is meant to used by laymen).

I can delete one single file using something like this

        try{
          File f=new File("dailyReport_08232011.txt");
          f.delete();
        }
        catch(Exception e){ 
                System.out.println(e);
        }

but can I delete the files having a certain prefix (eg: dailyReport08 for the 8th month ) I could easily do that in shell script by using rm -rf dailyReport08*.txt .

But File f=new File("dailyReport_08*.txt"); doesnt work in Java (as expected).

Now is any thing as such possible in Java without running a loop that searches the directory for files?

Can I achieve this using some special characters similar to * used in shell script?

share|improve this question
3  
What wrong with looping? – user802421 Aug 30 '11 at 8:32
    
i also feels the same... why not loop? – amod0017 Aug 30 '11 at 8:32
    
I know its possible with loop...but as I said I might be having a large number of files(500 is just a number)...so instead of using a loop if its possible the other way around like a shell script I feel that would be better... – Sangeet Menon Aug 30 '11 at 8:35
2  
@S.M.09: so you want to do something on a big number on inputs. Sounds like you need a loop. Again: why don't you want a loop? Do you think it's somehow slower? Hint: even the shell will need to loop at some point, you just don't see that loop. – Joachim Sauer Aug 30 '11 at 8:39
1  
If you like the shell, there is an answer to this question that may help. – Ray Toal Aug 30 '11 at 8:39
up vote 17 down vote accepted

No, you can't. Java is rather low-level language -- comparing with shell-script -- so things like this must be done more explicetly. You should search for files with required mask with folder.listFiles(FilenameFilter), and iterate through returned array deleting each entry. Like this:

final File folder = ...
final File[] files = folder.listFiles( new FilenameFilter() {
    @Override
    public boolean accept( final File dir,
                           final String name ) {
        return name.matches( "dailyReport_08.*\\.txt" );
    }
} );
for ( final File file : files ) {
    if ( !file.delete() ) {
        System.err.println( "Can't remove " + file.getAbsolutePath() );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did get a faster result with FilenameFilter than running a loop....Thank You – Sangeet Menon Aug 30 '11 at 8:54
    
Thumb up! No for loop at all. – user802421 Aug 30 '11 at 9:14
    
@user802421: There is a for loop but, I intended to avoid a loop for searching files with pattern...and as I said this gives a faster result to a logic I tried with a loop searching for files and deleting when found one.... – Sangeet Menon Sep 2 '11 at 5:27

You can use a loop

for(File f: directory.listFiles())
    if(f.getName().startsWith("dailyReport_"))
        f.delete();
share|improve this answer

There isn't a wildcard but you can implement a FilenameFilter and check the path with a startsWith("dailyReport_"). Then calling File.listFiles(filter) gives you an array of Files that you can loop through and call delete() on.

share|improve this answer

With Java 8:

public static boolean deleteFilesForPathByPrefix(final String path, final String prefix) {
    boolean success = true;
    try (DirectoryStream<Path> newDirectoryStream = Files.newDirectoryStream(Paths.get(path), prefix + "*")) {
        for (final Path newDirectoryStreamItem : newDirectoryStream) {
            Files.delete(newDirectoryStreamItem);
        }
    } catch (final Exception e) {
        success = false;
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return success;
}

Simple version:

public static void deleteFilesForPathByPrefix(final Path path, final String prefix) {
    try (DirectoryStream<Path> newDirectoryStream = Files.newDirectoryStream(path, prefix + "*")) {
        for (final Path newDirectoryStreamItem : newDirectoryStream) {
            Files.delete(newDirectoryStreamItem);
        }
    } catch (final Exception e) { // empty
    }
}

Modify the Path/String argument as needed. You can even convert between File and Path. Path is preferred for Java >= 8.

share|improve this answer

Use FileFilter like so:

File dir = new File(<path to dir>);
File[] toBeDeleted = dir.listFiles(new FileFilter() {
  boolean accept(File pathname) {
     return (pathname.getName().startsWith("dailyReport_08") && pathname.getName().endsWith(".txt"));
  } 

for (File f : toBeDeleted) {
   f.delete();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code would delete anything(including non txt files) starting with dailyReport_08 probably would have also check the extension as well...but the code given BegemoT gives the perfect result..Thanks any way – Sangeet Menon Aug 30 '11 at 8:59

You can't do it without a loop. But you can enhance this loop. First of all, ask you a question: "what's the problem with searching and removing in the loop?" If it's too slow for some reason, you can just run your loop in a separate thread, so that it will not affect your user interface.

Other advice - put your daily reports in a separate folder and then you will be able to remove this folder with all content.

share|improve this answer
    
A monthly folder agreed!!!....could have gone for a monthly folder but then certain requirements like merging files(of different months) could then become tedious....And looping as already stated large no of files... – Sangeet Menon Aug 30 '11 at 8:52

Have a look at Apache FileUtils which offers many handy file manipulations.

share|improve this answer

I agree with BegemoT.

However, just one optimization: If you need a simple FilenameFilter, there is a class in the Google packages. So, in this case you do not even have to create your own anonymous class.

import com.google.common.io.PatternFilenameFilter;

final File folder = ...
final File[] files = folder.listFiles(new PatternFilenameFilter("dailyReport_08.*\\.txt"));

// loop through the files
for ( final File file : files ) {
    if ( !file.delete() ) {
        System.err.println( "Can't remove " + file.getAbsolutePath() );
    }
}

Enjoy !

share|improve this answer

I know I'm late to the party. However, for future reference, I wanted to contribute a java 8 stram solution that doesn't involve a loop.

It may not be pretty. I welcome suggestions to make it look better. However, it does the job:

Files.list(deleteDirectory).filter(p -> p.toString().contains("dailyReport_08")).forEach((p) -> {
    try {
        Files.deleteIfExists(p);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
});

Alternatively, you can use Files.walk which will traverse the directory depth-first. That is, if the files are buried in different directories.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this solution avoids a loop, it just uses the newer syntax. – Jim Ford Jul 13 at 13:25

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