Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is anyone able to "genericalize" the class listed at the bottom of this question? I would like the class not to be locked to a delegate of type "GetStateDelegate", but a general delegate. Is that possible?

I've tried a couple of things, but 1) C# does not like a class declaration of this kind:

public class StringToMethodMapper<T> where T: System.Delegate

This yields "Cannot use System.Delegate as type parameter constraint"

An hints to get me on the right track is appreciated. Also, if a solution exists, I want the consumer to be as little affected by the changes as possible. For instance, I'd rather not change the calling code for "Add(string, delegate)".

The code:

public delegate bool GetStateDelegate(object someObject);

public class StringToMethodMapper
{
    private Dictionary<string, GetStateDelegate> _methods;

    public StringToMethodMapper()
    {
        _methods = new Dictionary<string, GetStateDelegate>();
    }

    public void Add(string key, GetStateDelegate method)
    {
        _methods.Add(key, method);
    }

    internal virtual GetStateDelegate GetMethodFor(string key)
    {
        foreach (var storedKey in _methods.Keys)
        {
            if (key.ToUpper().StartsWith(storedKey.ToUpper()))
            {
                return _methods[storedKey];
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In terms of making it generic... well, it's sort of possible. I have a library called Unconstrained Melody which uses IL rewriting for generics with delegate constraints - and you could use the same IL rewriter in your code. It's pretty ugly though. Basically IL supports the constraint you want, but C# doesn't. Note that there's no possible constraint for "it should be a type deriving from MulticastDelegate but not including MulticastDelegate itself"... so someone could create a StringToMethodMapper<MulticastDelegate> but that's pretty unlickly.

If you're happy to stick to one kind of delegate signature (e.g. "always three parameters and a void return") then you can use the approach from George's answer. If it should be for any delegate type, then you're stuck with the IL rewriting approach or abandoning the constraint.


(Edited based on comments.)

In terms of the rest of the code, that's a very slow use of a dictionary. Currently you've got O(n) lookup. Just use normal Dictionary access via TryGetValue, but pass StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase (or something similar) into the constructor to get a case-insensitive match. That won't get a starts-with match, admittedly... but your current approach isn't deterministic anyway, as you can end up with "foo" and "fo" as keys in the dictionary, both of which will match - so you're relying on the order in which the iterator returns the keys. Not a great idea.

If you really need the StartsWith behaviour, you might want to investigate implementing a trie - or if you're happy with O(N) lookup, I would keep a List<KeyValuePair<string, TDelegate>> to make it clear that you're not really using it as a dictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
The point is to have a StartsWith comaprison so I cannot use TryGetValue. In my original code I have checks for duplicate matches which throws exceptions, but I left it out as it's irellevant for the question. I will look at your library though - looks interesting! –  Nilzor Aug 30 '11 at 9:27
    
...and I guess you answer my question with saying it's not possible to have any kind of delegate. –  Nilzor Aug 30 '11 at 9:30
    
@Nilzor: Well, only with the IL rewriting approach. –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '11 at 9:35
    
@Nilzor: I've added a bit more detail, and moved my comments about the overall design. –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '11 at 9:38

Something like below, perhaps (typed without an IDE). Obviously client will need to add the generic parameters, but i think the call to add still work.

public class StringToMethodMapper<T, TResult>
{
    private Dictionary<string, Func<T, TResult>> _methods;

    public StringToMethodMapper()
    {
        _methods = new Dictionary<string, Func<T, TResult>>();
    }

    public void Add(string key, Func<T, TResult> method)
    {
        _methods.Add(key, method);
    }

    internal virtual Func<T, TResult> GetMethodFor(string key)
    {
        foreach (var storedKey in _methods.Keys)
        {
            if (key.ToUpper().StartsWith(storedKey.ToUpper()))
            {
                return _methods[storedKey];
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess this is what comes closest to what I want to acheieve given what's possible in C#. Thanks. –  Nilzor Aug 30 '11 at 10:08

One way to do this is to swap your delegate for an interface

public interface IGetState
{
   bool GetState(object someObject);
}

then you can use this interface as your constraint

public class StringToMethodMapper<T> where T: IGetState
{
   ...
}

You can then implement the interface to make something specific, for example:

public class FileSystemState : IGetState
{
   public bool GetState(object someObject)
   {
      // get state from the FS
   }
}

and then

var fileSystemMapper = new StringToMethodMapper<FileSystemState>();
share|improve this answer
    
This would work, but it would force me to change the calling code. –  Nilzor Aug 30 '11 at 10:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.