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For example I have four classes like:

class A;

class B{
protected:
    void check(const A &a); 
};

class C : public A, public B;
class D : public B;

Now I would like to write check function that does nothing if the caller and parameter are the same:

void B::check(const A &a){
   if(*this != a){
      //do something
   }
   else{
      //do nothing
   }
}

However this won't compile as class B doesn't know anything about class C, which will one day call B's function check on itself. It would be easy to cast this into A, but that would give an error if one day class D would call that check as it has nothing to do with A. How is such thing done then?

Edit: I might had to mention that class C and D will have interface for calling that check which is not avalible outside these classes, but it'll do nothing more than just pass parameter to inner function

share|improve this question
    
How are you going to call the check() function ? Can you give example ? –  iammilind Aug 30 '11 at 11:27
    
This doesn't compile because there's no operator!= for types B and A, not because of the reason you give. Please clarify. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 30 '11 at 11:28
    
@iammilind as you can see B is designed only to be inherited, so only way to call B is through C or D e.g. C c; A a; c.check(a); c.check(c); d.check(c).. etc –  Raven Aug 30 '11 at 11:32
    
@R. Martinho Fernandes I get the same error as you, but it's because these 2 doesn't anything to comapre against.. or is it not? –  Raven Aug 30 '11 at 11:34
    
@Raven: it's because you haven't overloaded operator!=. You cannot compare non-scalar types unless you overload the operators yourself. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 30 '11 at 11:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This would work if you add a virtual destructor to A:

void B::check(const A &a)
{
    if (dynamic_cast<const B*>(&a) == this)
    {
        std::cout << "same object" << std::endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, it won't. B is not a base class of A, which makes this ill-formed. (See 5.2.7/5) –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 11:53
    
This is not ill-formed, because A becomes a polymorphic type when adding a virtual destructor (See 5.2.7/6). –  Stephan Aug 30 '11 at 12:13
    
Ah, right. And then 5.2.7/8 second bullet applies (the cross-cast). { Blergh, I hate requirements of the form "1. A must be X. 2. except that A can be Y" }. Upvoted. –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 12:58
    
Upvoted & answer: first of all it's working, it doesn't introduce many changes to code and also looks good and meaningful. –  Raven Aug 30 '11 at 13:38
if(*this != a)

Check is meaningless because this(class B) will never be same as type of class A because both are unrelated classes.

It is not clear what you want to do, but if you want your Base class pointer to be pointing to your derived class object then there must be a inheritance(is-a) relationship between them.

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1  
however if B was inherited by C, this pointer is C and that one is related to A actually... –  Raven Aug 30 '11 at 11:28
2  
@Raven: That's just saying, "however, if the question was a different one, this answer wouldn't apply". Clarify your question to ask what you really mean. –  Kerrek SB Aug 30 '11 at 11:34
    
I think that "However" thing was well said by code I posted.. it can be seen that C is derived as well as D and I've said I'll call check for C and D only (as B have no public interface) –  Raven Aug 30 '11 at 11:37
    
The problem is that A and B are only indirectly related by class C, and neither A nor B is really aware of C. Except, of course, when 5.2.7/7 applies. See my solution. –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 11:55

There's only one possible escape hatch here. If both A and B have a virtual function, then you can dynamic_cast both this and &a. And per 5.2.7/7 "If T is “pointer to cv void,” then the result is a pointer to the most derived object pointed to by v."

Therefore, this code works:

void B::check(const A &a){
   if(dynamic_cast<void const*>(const_cast<B const>(this) != dynamic_cast<void const*>(&a)) {
      //do something
   } ...

Nothing else gets you a pointer to the most derived object without knowing that type.

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You probably want to check whether the instances are the same:

void B::check(const A &a){
   if(this != &a){
      //do something
   }
   else{
      //do nothing
   }
}

Comparing the content of different classes doesn't make much sense to me.

share|improve this answer
    
this != &a is always false because both are unrelated classes –  iammilind Aug 30 '11 at 11:28
    
This doesn't make sense, either: You can neither convert A* to B* nor B* to A*. –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 11:33

You can do something like this:

void check(const A &a){
   if((void*)this != (void*)&a){
      //do something
   }
   else{
      //do nothing
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this will NOT catch the case of class C: A, B. The A and B subobjects are distinct. –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 11:44
    
@MSalters Is this what you mean? ideone.com/gN9sm –  Patrik Aug 30 '11 at 12:00
    
Yes. Both conversions are defined by 4.10/2. This returns the storage locations of A and B, respectively. I think your example is really tricky because of the two empty-base optimizations that are possible. Add an int foo member to each, and they must be distinct so ((A*)(void*)(&a))->foo becomes a valid way and unique way to refer to the foo in A –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 12:16
    
See also ideone.com/myYge where it does fail. –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 12:47

Is this what you're looking for — to check whether this and a are both parts of the same object of type C?

void B::check(A &a)
{
    std::cout << (static_cast<C*>(this) != static_cast<C*>(&a)) << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    C c;
    D d;
    A& a1 = c;
    A a2;
    boolalpha(std::cout);
    c.check(a1); // false
    c.check(a2); // true
    d.check(a1); // true
}
share|improve this answer
    
This should be a dynamic_cast. The static_cast would produce Undefined Behavior if *this isn't actually a C. Also, note that "class B doesn't know anything about class C" according to the question (i.e. you can't check this for all possible types) –  MSalters Aug 30 '11 at 11:46

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