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My rating system is quite simple, either the user like or he doesn't like the article.

Basically, I have something like this and it works perfectly :

class Article
  has_many :ratings
  def self.by_ratings
    all.sort_by{|article| (article.ratings.where(like: true).size).to_f / (article.ratings.size) }
  end
end

As you can guess, our app becomes huge in database, traffic increase and this part of the code becomes a bottleneck.

I am trying to rewrite it in pure sql for performance increase. I am also trying to make it as an ActiveRelation to chain up with other conditions. Trying also to write the sql but no success. Any ideas ?

Thanks !

Using :

  • Rails 3.0.10
  • ActiveRecord
  • Sqlite 3 (We can switch to Postgresql)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I haven't been able to test this SQL in your model yet, but can you try:

select articles_ratings.*, likes/total rating from (select articles.*, SUM(if(articles.like, 1, 0)) likes, count(*) total from articles JOIN ratings on article_id = articles.id GROUP BY articles.id) articles_ratings ORDER BY rating desc

That should hopefully give you a list of articles, sorted by their rating (highest to lowest). I can try and follow up with some rails if that works.

EDIT As suggesteed by @socjopa, if you're not trying to get this to production immediately, my next recommendation would be to move this query to a view. Treat it like any other ActiveRecord, and associate it to your Articles accordingly.

With the appropriate indexes, the view should be fairly quick but may not really be necessary to calculate the rating value at runtime each time. You may also want to consider storing a rating column on your Articles table, if performance isn't where you need it to be. You could simply update this rating whenever an article rating is modified or created.

That said, this performance should be night and day over your current iteration.

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Yeah, I have come up with a sql which look like this one. Considering switching to mongodb, or another nosql because we have really a lot trouble, getting the things clean, fast and flexible. –  Hartator Aug 31 '11 at 10:55
    
I believe this query should be fairly quick (depending on the size of your dataset), and would definitely suggest the _cache column approach (listed below) as your most efficient solution. You can clean up the SQL by moving this into a view (also described below) to give you some cleaner rails code. Good luck –  Kristian PD Aug 31 '11 at 11:03

I am making some assumptions about your implementation, like I do assume that you have value field in your Rating model that can be 1 for a "like" and -1 for "not like", etc

Start with:

class Article
   has_one :rating_value, :class_name => 'RatingValue'
end

class RatingValue < ActiveRecord::Base
   belongs_to :article
   set_table_name "rating_values"
end

So, in a migration you generate view (postgres example):

   execute %q{CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW rating_values AS
 SELECT ratings.article_id, sum(ratings.value) AS value
   FROM ratings
  GROUP BY ratings.article_id;}

given you have a database view like this, you can make a scope you need for sorting:

scope :ascend_by_rating, {:joins => %Q{
LEFT JOIN "rating_values"
ON rating_values.article_id = article.id },
                                          :order => "rating_values.value ASC"}

Should be much more efficent than your sorting attempt in Ruby.

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I agree with moving this query to a view as it makes things cleaner (or possibly just a column on the article table as described above). I believe the OP needs a rating relative to the total number of ratings, in this case he'll just get a positive or negative integer but it won't give an idea of an overall "score" –  Kristian PD Aug 30 '11 at 13:11

What you need is a cache column.

1) Create a migration in order to ass the cache column:

class AddRatingCacheToArticles < ActiveRecord::Migration

  def self.up
    add_column :articles, :rating_cache, :decimal, :default => 0.0
  end

  def self.down
    remove_column :articles, :rating_cache
  end

end

2) Define an update method in Article which will do the count:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :ratings

  def update_rating_cache
    current_rating = ratings.where(:like => true).count.to_f/ratings.count.to_f
    update_attribute(:rating_cache, current_rating)
  end
end

3) Setup a callback in Rating to trigger the update_rating_cache method when they are saved:

class Rating < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :article

  after_save :update_article_rating_cache
  after_destroy :update_article_rating_cache

  def update_article_rating_cache
    article.update_rating_cache if article
  end
end

4) It is now super easy to sort your articles by rating:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :ratings

  def self.by_ratings
    order('rating_cache DESC')
  end

  def update_rating_cache
    current_rating = ratings.where(:like => true).count.to_f/ratings.count.to_f
    update_attribute(:rating_cache, current_rating)
  end
end

And that can be used as an ActiveRelation!

Good luck :)

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And do not forget to initialize the rating cache of your existing articles: Article.all.each{ |article| article.update_rating_cache } –  jbescoyez Aug 30 '11 at 13:17
    
I'd also recommend this approach if the OP can make a DB change easily and doesn't need a quick production fix. –  Kristian PD Aug 30 '11 at 13:34

From your by_ratings method, I understand that you want the articles sorted by most liked reviews/ratings.

Can we rewrite the method into a scope like this:

scope :by_ratings, select('articles.*, ((select count(id) from ratings where article_id = articles.id) - count(article_id) ) as article_diff_count')
 .joins(:ratings).group('article_id').where('like = ?',true).order('article_diff_count asc')

I chose to compare the difference instead of ratio between total ratings and liked ratings since this should be lighter on the SQL engine. Hope this helps.

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