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I've tried to eliminate the common causes of seg faults such as dereferencing a null pointer, but I'm stumped. This error does not appear on my test machine in debug mode, but does appear on my production machine the release compile. Both are set to /O0 to eliminate that as a possibility. When I comment out the string assignment, the seg fault goes away, now I just need to understand what's happening so I can fix it.

There may be something more obvious, but an additional complication is that this code is being called by a kernel mode application, and the only instructions I have from the vendor about writing safe code for the system is "every function which needs anything from the operating system or has to wait for anything from the OS will not work" (verbatim).

union {
    REAL_T real[8];
    char   byte[64];
} fileName;

void transferFilenames () {
    string tempname;

    // This is from an api I must use, it retrieves values from NVRAM on
    // an accessory board.  Specifically it will return 8 REAL_T values
    // and store them starting at &filename.real[0], inp/outpArray are 
    // globals defined elsewhere.
    inpArray.I7_ARRAY.INDEX = 2903;
    inpArray.I7_ARRAY.LEN = 8;
    inpArray.I7_ARRAY.Z_PAR_PTR = &fileName.real[0];
    b_array ( READ_CYCLE_PARAMS, &status, &inpArray, &outpArray );

    // if status != 0, there was an error
    if ( status == 0 ) {
        // there is no guarantee of being null terminated
        fileName.byte[63] = 0;

        /* This test code didn't fix the problem
        int i;
        char myStr[64];
        for ( i = 0; i < 64; i++ )
            myStr[i] = fileName.byte[i];
        if ( myStr[0] != '\0' )
            string mystring( myStr ); // seg fault
        */
        tempname.assign( fileName.byte ); // Throws seg fault
        // tempname.assign( &fileName.byte[0] ); // try to be more explicit

        // controlBlock is a global class defined elsewhere
        controlBlock->setFileName ( tempname, ISINPUT);
    } else {
        controlBlock->setFileName( "BAD", ISINPUT );
    }
    return;
}

When I overloaded my control block to take a char* directly controlBlock->setFileName( &fileName.byte[0] ), and removed the string assignment altogether the segmentation fault disappeared. All the overload does is assign the char* to a local string and call the regular method.

What am I missing behind the scenes?

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What does your core file/debugger say that fileName.byte is when it crashes? –  Mark B Aug 30 '11 at 13:33
    
@MarkB There are no dump files created when the program crashes. The real time system doesn't support live debugging and the relaxed timing system doesn't exhibit this bug. –  Stephen Aug 30 '11 at 13:37
    
I had previously commented out all the code in this block except the assign statement and the segfault persisted. Inverting that and leaving only the assign commented removed the segfault. –  Stephen Aug 30 '11 at 13:43
1  
Are you using std::string in other places as well? It does allocate on the heap, not stack. –  murrekatt Aug 30 '11 at 14:01
    
Adding to murrekatt's comment, and mine after my answer: The clause every function which needs anything from the operating system or has to wait for anything from the OS will not work may preclude you from using huge chunks of the C++ library. The system in question may well implement malloc along the lines of malloc (size_t) {kill (0, SEGBUS); } –  David Hammen Aug 30 '11 at 14:08
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem may not be in the call to tempname.assign(). Pipelining can result in somewhat erroneous reports of where the demon really lies. This statement makes me think the demon lies elsewhere:

When I overloaded my control block to take a char* directly controlBlock->setFileName( &fileName.byte[0] ), and removed the string assignment altogether the segmentation fault disappeared.

You are passing a std::string to setFileName in one case, a char* in the other. Try replacing

controlBlock->setFileName ( tempname, ISINPUT);

with

controlBlock->setFileName ( tempname.c_str(), ISINPUT);

Addendum
The problem may well be with using std::string, period. std::string::assign() will call malloc if the reserved size is too small. Making the reserved size sufficiently large may not work either; this may just push the malloc call into the constructor. Using something that allocates memory dynamically doesn't jibe with the clause every function which needs anything from the operating system or has to wait for anything from the OS will not work.

In fact, this clause may well preclude the use of huge chunks of the C++ library on this machine. The C++ library is pretty loose with regard to allocating and deallocating memory, and std::string does lots of it.

share|improve this answer
    
Using tempname.c_str() still threw the segfault. –  Stephen Aug 30 '11 at 13:41
    
I also agree that the problem may not be at the assign() but it's the only line of code I can narrow down to reproduce the bug. –  Stephen Aug 30 '11 at 13:49
    
Given your comments elsewhere, do you have a timing bug? Do you need to somehow wait until b_array has finished its job? Another thing to beware of is that setting one member of a union and then accessing another is, strictly speaking, illegal (it is undefined behavior). While this trick does work on most machines and with most compilers, there is always that one strange beast where it doesn't. Perhaps you have caught such a beast by the tail. –  David Hammen Aug 30 '11 at 13:56
2  
One last thought: std::string::assign() is going to call malloc. Is this safe, particularly given that "every function which needs anything from the operating system or has to wait for anything from the OS will not work"? –  David Hammen Aug 30 '11 at 13:58
    
I don't need to wait for b_array (it's a blocking call). Your comment about the malloc internal to the string assignment could very well be the explanation. We get 15 chars by default so I tried assigning something smaller and larger. Smaller doesn't produce the error but larger does. –  Stephen Aug 30 '11 at 14:08
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