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What I want to do is something like this: I have enums with combined flagged values.

public static class EnumExtension
{
    public static bool IsSet<T>( this T input, T matchTo ) 
        where T:enum //the constraint I want that doesn't exist in C#3
    {    
    	return (input & matchTo) != 0;
    }
}

So then I could do:

MyEnum tester = MyEnum.FlagA | MyEnum.FlagB

if( tester.IsSet( MyEnum.FlagA ) )
    //act on flag a

Unfortunately C#'s generic where constraints have no enum restriction, only class and struct. C# doesn't see enums as structs (even though they are value types) so I can't add extension types like this.

Anyone know a workaround?

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1  
Keith: download version 0.0.0.2 of UnconstrainedMelody - I've implemented HasAll and HasAny. Enjoy. –  Jon Skeet Sep 11 '09 at 21:22
    
What do you mean by “C# doesn't see enums as structs”? You can use enum types as type parameters that are constrained to struct just fine. –  Timwi Sep 25 '10 at 19:38
    
check this article here: codeproject.com/KB/cs/ExtendEnum.aspx 'IsValidEnumValue' or 'IsFlagsEnumDefined' methods are probably the answer to your question. –  dmihailescu Jul 1 '11 at 14:44
    
@dmihailescu - see @Jon Skeet's far more complete and detailed solution in the accepted answer. –  Keith Jul 4 '11 at 8:44
    
@dmihailescu: No, that code project is addressing a different, more complicated problem: determining whether a given value is a valid value for a given Enum. E.g. if you are handed a value "9", is that valid for your Enum? (No if you only have 3 flag bits). OP is trying to generalize simple bit operations on a Flags enum. These operations are one-liners, if you have a SPECIFIC Enum type. E.g. clearing a Flag bit is something like value = value & (~MyEnum.FlagA). But its a pain having to write that each time, so it would be nice to write generic methods once, and be done with it. –  ToolmakerSteve Mar 19 '14 at 6:43

8 Answers 8

up vote 39 down vote accepted

EDIT: This is now live in version 0.0.0.2 of UnconstrainedMelody.

(As requested on my blog post about enum constraints. I've included the basic facts below for the sake of a standalone answer.)

The best solution is to wait for me to include it in UnconstrainedMelody1. This is a library which takes C# code with "fake" constraints such as

where T : struct, IEnumConstraint

and turns it into

where T : struct, System.Enum

via a postbuild step.

It shouldn't be too hard to write IsSet... although catering for both Int64-based and UInt64-based flags could be the tricky part. (I smell some helper methods coming on, basically allowing me to treat any flags enum as if it had a base type of UInt64.)

What would you want the behaviour to be if you called

tester.IsSet(MyFlags.A | MyFlags.C)

? Should it check that all the specified flags are set? That would be my expectation.

I'll try to do this on the way home tonight... I'm hoping to have a quick blitz on useful enum methods to get the library up to a usable standard quickly, then relax a bit.

EDIT: I'm not sure about IsSet as a name, by the way. Options:

  • Includes
  • Contains
  • HasFlag (or HasFlags)
  • IsSet (it's certainly an option)

Thoughts welcome. I'm sure it'll be a while before anything's set in stone anyway...


1 or submit it as a patch, of course...

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I suppose if multiple flags are passed in it should check for all of them. My actual fix for this (back in 2008 when I asked it) was to have a template extension method for each flags enum - messy but works. Never bothered with the check for multiple flags because all the checks we have are for a single flag - not such a problem in internal only code but something that would need to be accounted for in an shared library. –  Keith Sep 11 '09 at 9:32
1  
You had to go and mention PostSharp LOL :o postsharp.org/blog/generic-constraints-for-enums-and-delegates –  Sam Harwell Sep 11 '09 at 9:34
1  
Or actually simpler HasAny() and HasAll() –  Keith Sep 11 '09 at 10:39
1  
Yes, I agree that's even better. colors.HasAny(Colors.Red | Colors.Blue) looks like very readable code. =) –  Blixt Sep 11 '09 at 10:49
1  
HasAny and HasAll seem awesome. –  IDisposable Sep 15 '09 at 23:29

Darren, that would work if the types were specific enumerations - for general enumerations to work you have to cast them to ints (or more likely uint) to do the boolean math:

public static bool IsSet( this Enum input, Enum matchTo )
{
    return ( Convert.ToUInt32( input ) & Convert.ToUInt32( matchTo ) ) != 0;
}
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1  
And if you have a ridiculous number of flags, you can call GetTypeCode() on the arguments and Convert.ToUint64() –  Kit Sep 10 '09 at 2:42
    
Awesome, the combination of 'Enum` and Convert.ToUInt32 I didn't find anywhere else. AFAIK, Its the only decent Pre-Net-4 solution that also works in VB. BTW, if matchTo might have multiple flag bits, then replace != 0 with == Convert.ToUInt32(matchTo). –  ToolmakerSteve Mar 19 '14 at 6:56
    
Note that Convert.ToUInt32 used with an enum will use the Convert.ToUInt32(object) overload, meaning that CLR will first box these values before passing then to the ToUInt32 method. In most cases this won't matter, but it's good to know that you'll keep the GC rather busy if you're using something like this to parse millions of enums per second. –  Groo Dec 18 '14 at 15:08

Actually, it is possible, with an ugly trick. However, it cannot be used for extension methods.

public abstract class Enums<Temp> where Temp : class {
    public static TEnum Parse<TEnum>(string name) where TEnum : struct, Temp {
    	return (TEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(TEnum), name); 
    }
}
public abstract class Enums : Enums<Enum> { }

Enums.IsSet<DateTimeKind>("Local")

If you want to, you can give Enums<Temp> a private constructor and a public nested abstract inherited class with Temp as Enum, to prevent inherited versions for non-enums.

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You can achieve this using IL Weaving and ExtraConstraints

Allows you to write this code

public class Sample
{
    public void MethodWithDelegateConstraint<[DelegateConstraint] T> ()
    {        
    }
    public void MethodWithEnumConstraint<[EnumConstraint] T>()
    {
    }
}

What gets compiled

public class Sample
{
    public void MethodWithDelegateConstraint<T>() where T: Delegate
    {
    }

    public void MethodWithEnumConstraint<T>() where T: struct, Enum
    {
    }
}
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The way I do it is put a struct constraint, then check that T is an enum at runtime. This doesn't eliminate the problem completely, but it does reduce it somewhat

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6  
where T : struct, IComparable, IFormattable, IConvertible -- this is the closest you can get to enum :) –  Kit Sep 10 '09 at 2:39

This doesn't answer the original question, but there is now a method in .NET 4 called Enum.HasFlag which does what you are trying to do in your example

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Jeff Bridgman Apr 24 '14 at 14:11
    
Upvoted because at this point, most everyone should be using .NET 4 (or higher) and so they should be using this method instead of trying to hack it together. –  CptRobby Nov 20 '14 at 20:01
    
Upvoted. However their solution uses boxing of the argument flag. .NET 4.0 is five years old now. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Apr 19 at 8:57

Using your original code, inside the method you can also use reflection to test that T is an enum:

public static class EnumExtension
{
    public static bool IsSet<T>( this T input, T matchTo )
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Must be an enum", "input");
        }
        return (input & matchTo) != 0;
    }
}
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2  
Thanks, but that turns a compile time issue (the where constraint) into a runtime one (your exception). Also you'd still need to convert the inputs to ints before you could do anything with them. –  Keith Sep 11 '09 at 11:13

Here's some code that I just did up that seems to work like you want without having to do anything too crazy. It's not restricted to only enums set as Flags, but there could always be a check put in if need be.

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    public static bool ContainsFlag(this Enum source, Enum flag)
    {
        var sourceValue = ToUInt64(source);
        var flagValue = ToUInt64(flag);

        return (sourceValue & flagValue) == flagValue;
    }

    public static bool ContainsAnyFlag(this Enum source, params Enum[] flags)
    {
        var sourceValue = ToUInt64(source);

        foreach (var flag in flags)
        {
            var flagValue = ToUInt64(flag);

            if ((sourceValue & flagValue) == flagValue)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }

    // found in the Enum class as an internal method
    private static ulong ToUInt64(object value)
    {
        switch (Convert.GetTypeCode(value))
        {
            case TypeCode.SByte:
            case TypeCode.Int16:
            case TypeCode.Int32:
            case TypeCode.Int64:
                return (ulong)Convert.ToInt64(value, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

            case TypeCode.Byte:
            case TypeCode.UInt16:
            case TypeCode.UInt32:
            case TypeCode.UInt64:
                return Convert.ToUInt64(value, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
        }

        throw new InvalidOperationException("Unknown enum type.");
    }
}
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