Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried searching for people with similar questions, but haven't found anything.

I have two dates in JavaScript, both set to the same value... Equality Testing fails on ==, but >= and <= evaluate true.

Below is the code I have in play:

var startDate = new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0 );

var dt = new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0 );

if( startDate == dt )
    document.write('They Equal<br />');

if( startDate > dt )
    document.write('Start Date is > dt<br />');

if( startDate >= dt )
    document.write('Start Date is >= dt<br />');

if( startDate < dt )
    document.write('Start Date is < dt<br />');

if( startDate <= dt )
    document.write('Start Date is <= dt<br />');

if( dt == startDate )
    document.write('They Equal<br />');

if( dt > startDate )
    document.write('dt > startDate<br />');

if( dt >= startDate )
    document.write('dt >= Start Date <br />');

if( dt < startDate )
    document.write('dt < Start Date <br />');

if( dt <= startDate )
    document.write('dt <= Start Date <br />');  

document.write( dt );
document.write( '<br />');
document.write( startDate );

Has anyone encountered anything like this, or am I doing something fundamentally wrong?

I tested this is Internet Explorer (9), Firefox 5+, and Chrome.

Update:

So two people posted great answers to my problem, and I thank both of you: xdazz and DaveRandom. I had read an earlier post on stackoverflow.com on a similar question and a guy said that date objects could be compared like any others, and any other example I found always did a < or > type of compare, never a full equality so I wasn't able to make the connection as to why I was doing it wrong.

Thanks to you two, and the others that posted similar answers.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

When you use <= or >= to compare two date object, they are compared via valueOf, which for Date is the same as getTime.

But when you use ==, they are two different object of same type, so it return false.

Add some example:

> new Date(2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0) == new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0 )
false
> new Date(2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0).getTime() == new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0).getTime()
true
> new Date(2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0).valueOf() == new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0).valueOf()
true
> new Date(2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0).valueOf() == new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0).getTime()
true
share|improve this answer

I think if you do

var startDate = (new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0 )).getTime();
var dt = (new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0 )).getTime();

At the top of the script you will find it works.

The getTime() method returns the date as an integer, what you are doing there is comparing objects, rather than specific values.

EDIT Fixed above code

share|improve this answer
    
+1. You beat me to it! –  Shef Aug 30 '11 at 14:10
    
@Shef Only by about 50 seconds, and I'll give you a +1 for your troubles ;-) –  DaveRandom Aug 30 '11 at 14:13
var startDate = new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0 );

var dt = new Date( 2011, 7, 30, 0, 0, 0, 0 );

if( startDate.getTime() == dt.getTime() )
    console.log('They Equal<br />');
share|improve this answer

This is one of the many illogical parts of Javascript. You can work around this problem by converting the date to a number using .getTime() that will return how many milliseconds passed from that date and 00:00:00 of Jan 1, 1970.

if (a.getTime() == b.getTime()) ...

The == operator on the objects themselves will return always false because those two objects are indeed distinct mutable javascript objects.

share|improve this answer

You could also use dates.compare(a,b)

dates.compare(a,b)

Returns a number:

-1 if a < b
0 if a = b
1 if a > b
NaN if a or b is an illegal date

Thanks to some in this thread: Compare 2 dates with JavaScript

share|improve this answer
<Script>
function checkval()
{
var strfromdate=document.frmadmin.txtfromdate.value;
strfromdate=strfromdate.split("/");
//alert(strfromdate[2]+" "+strfromdate[0]+" "+strfromdate[1]);

var strtodate=document.frmadmin.txttodate.value;
strtodate=strtodate.split("/");

var fromDate = (new Date( strfromdate[2], strfromdate[0], strfromdate[1], 0, 0, 0, 0 )).getTime();
var toDate = (new Date( strtodate[2], strtodate[0], strtodate[1], 0, 0, 0, 0 )).getTime();
//alert(fromDate+" "+toDate);



    if(toDate<fromDate)
    {
        alert("To date should be greater than from date.");
        document.frmadmin.txttodate.focus();
        return false;
    }


    return true;
}
</Script>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.