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What does GetHashCode() calculate when invoked on the byte[] array? The 2 data arrays with equal content do not provide the same hash.

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8  
FYI: If you are on .NET4 ((IStructuralEquatable) myArray).GetHashCode(EqualityComparer<object>.Default) should give the same result for two arrays with same content. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…. –  FuleSnabel Aug 30 '11 at 15:25
    
yes, thank you, on .NET 4 –  Chesnokov Yuriy Aug 30 '11 at 20:04
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Like other non-primitive built-in types, it just returns something arbitrary. It definitely doesn't try to hash the contents of the array. See this answer.

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thank you for the link –  Chesnokov Yuriy Aug 30 '11 at 20:05

Arrays in .NET don't override Equals or GetHashCode, so the value you'll get is basically based on reference equality (i.e. the default implementation in Object) - for value equality you'll need to roll your own code (or find some from a third party). You may want to implement IEqualityComparer<byte[]> if you're trying to use byte arrays as keys in a dictionary etc.

EDIT: Here's a reusable array equality comparer which should be fine so long as the array element handles equality appropriately. Note that you mustn't mutate the array after using it as a key in a dictionary, otherwise you won't be able to find it again - even with the same reference.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public sealed class ArrayEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T[]>
{
    // You could make this a per-instance field with a constructor parameter
    private static readonly EqualityComparer<T> elementComparer
        = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;

    public bool Equals(T[] first, T[] second)
    {
        if (first == second)
        {
            return true;
        }
        if (first == null || second == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (first.Length != second.Length)
        {
            return false;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < first.Length; i++)
        {
            if (!elementComparer.Equals(first[i], second[i]))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T[] array)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            if (array == null)
            {
                return 0;
            }
            int hash = 17;
            foreach (T element in array)
            {
                hash = hash * 31 + elementComparer.GetHashCode(element);
            }
            return hash;
        }
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        byte[] x = { 1, 2, 3 };
        byte[] y = { 1, 2, 3 };
        byte[] z = { 4, 5, 6 };

        var comparer = new ArrayEqualityComparer<byte>();

        Console.WriteLine(comparer.GetHashCode(x));
        Console.WriteLine(comparer.GetHashCode(y));
        Console.WriteLine(comparer.GetHashCode(z));
        Console.WriteLine(comparer.Equals(x, y));
        Console.WriteLine(comparer.Equals(x, z));
    }
}
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yes, I'd be intrested in useing them as keys –  Chesnokov Yuriy Aug 30 '11 at 20:05
    
@Chesnokov Yuriy: Okay, I've edited some code into my answer. –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '11 at 20:11
    
thank you very much for the useful snippet. A bit off the topic if you please, your C# in depth book is very intresting, I'm going to read it. The g+ idea is superb introducing circles, compared to facebook, where you can not separate your contacts. It would be great to show different user page account content and information to every circle, e.g. one would not be happy to show some of work circle page content to his friends and vice versa. Can you advise if soon will we be able to register there? –  Chesnokov Yuriy Aug 31 '11 at 4:40
    
@Chesnokov: That's a bit off-topic for here, I'm afraid - and I wouldn't be able to tell you about any upcoming features anyway. –  Jon Skeet Aug 31 '11 at 5:22

byte[] inherits GetHashCode() from object, it doesn't override it. So what you get is basically object's implementation.

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I see, thank you very much –  Chesnokov Yuriy Aug 30 '11 at 20:06

If it's not the same instance, it will return different hashes. I'm guessing it is based on the memory address where it is stored somehow.

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no, it is not the same instance, I presume in that case hashes would be equal –  Chesnokov Yuriy Aug 30 '11 at 20:06

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