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I wrote a super simple script:

 #!/usr/bin/perl -w
 use strict;
 open (F, "<ids.txt") || die "fail: $!\n";
 my @ids = <F>;
 foreach my $string (@ids) {
 chomp($string);
 print "$string\n";
 }
 close F;

This is producing an expected output of all the contents of ids.txt:

hello

world

these

annoying

sourcecode

lines

Now I want to add a file-extension: .txt for every line. This line should do the trick:

 #!/usr/bin/perl -w
 use strict;
 open (F, "<ids.txt") || die "fail: $!\n";
 my @ids = <F>;
 foreach my $string (@ids) {
 chomp($string);
 $string .= ".txt";
 print "$string\n";
 }
 close F;

But the result is as follows:

.txto

.txtd

.txte

.txtying

.txtcecode

Instead of appending ".txt" to my lines, the first 4 letters of my string will be replaced by ".txt" Since I want to check if some files exist, I need the full filename with extension.

I have tried to chop, chomp, to substitute (s/\n//), joins and whatever. But the result is still a replacement instead of an append.

Where is the mistake?

share|improve this question
4  
On what platform are you running this, and what type of end-of-line (CR, CRLF?) does your file have? –  Mat Aug 30 '11 at 14:33
    
Where is $_ in your code? –  eugene y Aug 30 '11 at 14:35
    
+1 Interesting and tricky question. See my answer for the solution –  Jim Garrison Aug 30 '11 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

Chomp does not remove BOTH \r and \n if the file has DOS line endings and you are running on Linux/Unix.

What you are seeing is actually the original string, a carriage return, and the extension, which overwrites the first 4 characters on the display.

If the incoming file has DOS/Windows line endings you must remove both:

s/\R+$//
share|improve this answer
1  
Um no. chomp() always removes whatever the value of $/ is. On DOS/Windows chomp() should be \r\n. Now if the file was created on Windows and then moved to a *nix box then that could be an issue. Still it shouldn't be overwriting anything based on his code. –  Cfreak Aug 30 '11 at 14:40
3  
@Cfreak: You are correct but he's obviously working cross-platform. And also by overwrite I meant on the display, not in memory. On a unix system try print "abcd\rxyz\n" -- the result will be xyzd. –  Jim Garrison Aug 30 '11 at 14:42
3  
s/\R+\z// is what you want. –  tchrist Aug 30 '11 at 14:50
4  
@Cfreak: Are you sure $/ is "\r\n" on DOS and Windows? I think line endings are translated to just "\n" on input, and back again on output. That's the main difference between text and binary modes. –  Keith Thompson Aug 30 '11 at 15:17
2  
@Cfreak, Keith Thompson is 100% right. $/ is "\n" on Windows. Perl adds a :crlf layer by default which converts CRLF->LF on read and LF->CRLF on write, so there's no \r for chomp to remove. –  ikegami Aug 30 '11 at 20:33

A useful debugging technique when you are not quite sure why your data is getting set to what it is is to dump it with Data::Dumper:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use Data::Dumper ();
$Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1; # important to be able to actually see differences in whitespace, etc

open (F, "<ids.txt") || die "fail: $!\n";
my @ids = <F>;
foreach my $string (@ids) {
    chomp($string);
    print "$string\n";
    print Data::Dumper::Dumper( { 'string' => $string } );
}
close F;
share|improve this answer

have you tried this?

foreach my $string (@ids) {
  chomp($string);
  print $string.".txt\n";
}

I'm not sure what's wrong with your code though. these results are strange

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