Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What's the most efficient algorithm to find the rectangle with the largest area which will fit in the empty space?

Let's say the screen looks like this ('#' represents filled area):

....................
..............######
##..................
.................###
.................###
#####...............
#####...............
#####...............

A probable solution is:

....................
..............######
##...++++++++++++...
.....++++++++++++###
.....++++++++++++###
#####++++++++++++...
#####++++++++++++...
#####++++++++++++...

Normally I'd enjoy figuring out a solution. Although this time I'd like to avoid wasting time fumbling around on my own since this has a practical use for a project I'm working on. Is there a well-known solution?

Shog9 wrote:

Is your input an array (as implied by the other responses), or a list of occlusions in the form of arbitrarily sized, positioned rectangles (as might be the case in a windowing system when dealing with window positions)?

Yes, I have a structure which keeps track of a set of windows placed on the screen. I also have a grid which keeps track of all the areas between each edge, whether they are empty or filled, and the pixel position of their left or top edge. I think there is some modified form which would take advantage of this property. Do you know of any?

share|improve this question
up vote 17 down vote accepted

@lassevk

I found the referenced article, from DDJ: The Maximal Rectangle Problem

share|improve this answer
4  
This one is O(mn) time, which is optimal. – j_random_hacker Jan 11 '11 at 17:28

I'm the author of that Dr. Dobb's article and get occasionally asked about an implementation. Here is a simple one in C:

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
  int one;
  int two;
} Pair;

Pair best_ll = { 0, 0 };
Pair best_ur = { -1, -1 };
int best_area = 0;

int *c; /* Cache */
Pair *s; /* Stack */
int top = 0; /* Top of stack */

void push(int a, int b) {
  s[top].one = a;
  s[top].two = b;
  ++top;
}

void pop(int *a, int *b) {
  --top;
  *a = s[top].one;
  *b = s[top].two;
}


int M, N; /* Dimension of input; M is length of a row. */

void update_cache() {
  int m;
  char b;
  for (m = 0; m!=M; ++m) {
    scanf(" %c", &b);
    fprintf(stderr, " %c", b);
    if (b=='0') {
      c[m] = 0;
    } else { ++c[m]; }
  }
  fprintf(stderr, "\n");
}


int main() {
  int m, n;
  scanf("%d %d", &M, &N);
  fprintf(stderr, "Reading %dx%d array (1 row == %d elements)\n", M, N, M);
  c = (int*)malloc((M+1)*sizeof(int));
  s = (Pair*)malloc((M+1)*sizeof(Pair));
  for (m = 0; m!=M+1; ++m) { c[m] = s[m].one = s[m].two = 0; }
  /* Main algorithm: */
  for (n = 0; n!=N; ++n) {
    int open_width = 0;
    update_cache();
    for (m = 0; m!=M+1; ++m) {
      if (c[m]>open_width) { /* Open new rectangle? */
        push(m, open_width);
        open_width = c[m];
      } else /* "else" optional here */
      if (c[m]<open_width) { /* Close rectangle(s)? */
        int m0, w0, area;
        do {
          pop(&m0, &w0);
          area = open_width*(m-m0);
          if (area>best_area) {
            best_area = area;
            best_ll.one = m0; best_ll.two = n;
            best_ur.one = m-1; best_ur.two = n-open_width+1;
          }
          open_width = w0;
        } while (c[m]<open_width);
        open_width = c[m];
        if (open_width!=0) {
          push(m0, w0);
        }
      }
    }
  }
  fprintf(stderr, "The maximal rectangle has area %d.\n", best_area);
  fprintf(stderr, "Location: [col=%d, row=%d] to [col=%d, row=%d]\n",
                  best_ll.one+1, best_ll.two+1, best_ur.one+1, best_ur.two+1);
  return 0;
}

It takes its input from the console. You could e.g. pipe this file to it:

16 12
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 1 * * * * * * 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 * * * * * * 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 
0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0

And after printing its input, it will output:

The maximal rectangle has area 12.
Location: [col=7, row=6] to [col=12, row=5]

The implementation above is nothing fancy of course, but it's very close to the explanation in the Dr. Dobb's article and should be easy to translate to whatever is needed.

share|improve this answer
2  
Translated to Java: gist.github.com/mmadson/9637974 – Matthew Madson Mar 19 '14 at 9:00

Here's a page that has some code and some analysis.

Your particular problem begins a bit down on the page, search the page for the text maximal rectangle problem.

http://www.seas.gwu.edu/~simhaweb/cs151/lectures/module6/module6.html

share|improve this answer
3  
Good explanations on that page but it only gives a O(mn^2) algorithm, which is not optimal (see Mark Renouf's answer, which is). -1. – j_random_hacker Jan 11 '11 at 17:30

@lassevk

    // 4. Outer double-for-loop to consider all possible positions 
    //    for topleft corner. 
    for (int i=0; i < M; i++) {
      for (int j=0; j < N; j++) {

        // 2.1 With (i,j) as topleft, consider all possible bottom-right corners. 

        for (int a=i; a < M; a++) {
          for (int b=j; b < N; b++) {

HAHA... O(m2 n2).. That's probably what I would have come up with.

I see they go on to develop optmizations... looks good, I'll have a read.

share|improve this answer

You can use my algorithm (+Java implementation) to solve this problem, it is explained here.

My algorithm is able to find all rectangles, you just have to pick the largest, which is the very last value in the map.

share|improve this answer
5  
Thank you for the downvote without any justification. My algorithm is not optimal but its implementation is easy to understand. – gouessej Feb 6 '13 at 12:59
1  
Welcome to SO! No reason downvote is main feature of this site... – gavenkoa Apr 11 '13 at 19:32
2  
gavenkoa, I agree with you. I would have preferred a negative feedback as maybe it would have allowed to improve something in my code and it would have been more helpful for everybody. – gouessej Feb 4 '14 at 20:20
    
Most likely downvote is because the code is not hosted on SO. Can you migrate the code in to your answer? – tomdemuyt Sep 29 '15 at 18:42
    
@tomdemuyt Thanks. I have read no guideline stipulating that the source code should be hosted on SO: stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer "Links to external resources are encouraged, but please add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there. Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline" However, I have just improved the linked post by updating the link so that it points to the exact method that implements this algorithm. I hope it helps. – gouessej Sep 30 '15 at 8:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.