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If I have a table like:

StudentId  | ... | SchoolId
___________|_____|__________ 
1          | ... | SchoolA
2          | ... | SchoolA
3          | ... | SchoolB
...

And I want to delete a list of schools, from schoolA to schoolZ (using LINQ-to-SQL):

foreach(School s in schools){
    db.Schools.DeleteOnSubmit(s);
    db.submitChanges();
}

SchoolA and SchoolB will fail because of the FK references above

How can I continue and delete all other schools, discarding the ones where the exception occurred?

share|improve this question
    
You should always keep calls to SubmitChanges() outside of loops. The context will accumulate changes and can send them in batch. –  Yuck Aug 30 '11 at 14:45
    
Forgot to mention, SchoolId can have many more FK references to many more tables so checking them all is not an option –  DJPB Aug 30 '11 at 14:55

5 Answers 5

Only include schools that don't have any students:

var schoolsToDelete = schools.Where(x => !x.Students.Any());
db.Schools.DeleteAllOnSubmit(schoolsToDelete); 
db.submitChanges();
share|improve this answer

By default, LINQ to SQL fails on the first error and rolls back the transaction. If you want it to keep working on anything it can, you can pass in the ConflictMode overload on SubmitChanges to allow it to keep going. The following sample from "LINQ in Action" tries to issue all of the queued updates and then output the conflicts that were encountered by handling the ChangeConflictException.

try
{
    context.SubmitChanges(ConflictMode.ContinueOnConflict);
}
catch (ChangeConflictException)
{
    var exceptionDetail = 
        from conflict in context.ChangeConflicts
        from member in conflict.MemberConflicts
        select new
        {
            TableName = GetTableName(context, conflict.Object),
            MemberName = member.Member.Name,
            CurrentValue = member.CurrentValue.ToString(),
            DatabaseValue = member.DatabaseValue.ToString(),
            OriginalValue = member.OriginalValue.ToString()
        };
    exceptionDetail.Dump();
}

Naturally, it is much better to be proactive and only try to delete the records that are valid as Mark Cidade demonstrated.

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1  
But in this case is this the exception that should be thrown? in my case The exception being thrown is an SqlException and the database context colection of conflicts is empty... –  DJPB Aug 30 '11 at 17:18
1  
Note this flag is only useful for concurrency conflicts during UPDATEs, not for unique constraint violations for INSERTs. –  James Dunne May 22 '12 at 16:17

I agree with Mark Cidade, but I can suggest an improvement of using a join scope to send a single request to the database server.

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I agree with Mark's solution. If you wan't to delete the school and its students, you can use:

foreach (School s in schools)
{
    db.Students.DeleteAllOnSubmit(s.Students);
    db.Schools.DeleteOnSubmit(s);
}

db.submitChanges();

That way you are fulfilling the FK constraint, so no errors are thrown.

share|improve this answer

Found out a simple way

foreach(School s in schools){

    try{
        db.Schools.DeleteOnSubmit(s);

        db.submitChanges();
    }
    catch(SqlException exp){
        if(exp.Message.Contains("The DELETE statement conflicted with the REFERENCE constraint"))   //just checking if is FK reference
            db.Schools.InsertOnSubmit(s);   //=)
        else
            throw;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The performance will be terrible! You will be throwing thousands or millions of exceptions for large data sets, comparing strings and messing with the context in a loop! –  Vladislav Zorov Aug 31 '11 at 9:54

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