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for(var i=0,len=btns.length;i<len;i++){
    (function(){
     btns[i].addEventListener('click',function(e){
        console.log(i)
         },false)
    })(i)}}

Hello everyone, I'm recently learning Javascript. In the above code for understanding a bit of closure, you know, just set 3 buttons to log 3 different i.

Unfortunately, it failed. I know that I didn't get the point of closures. Why? I immediately execute the function so that the i in the listener's callback function won't share the same i

Hope someone can help~

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It would e much easier for us to help if you posted a link to a jsFiddle demonstrating your problem –  Grezzo Aug 30 '11 at 15:01
    
@Grezzo,Thanks for your advice,Next Time I'll do so –  Lanston Aug 30 '11 at 15:06
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2 Answers

You pass the i variable to the function, but the function ignores the argument and just binds to the i inside the function is the same variable as the one outside (because you specify an empty formal parameter list).

Therefore your loop has completed and increased the single i shared between all the closures to 3 before you get a chance to push any of the buttons.

Rewrite function() with function(i) and it will have a better chance of working.

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1  
Oh...I see,I wana to kill myself immediately,Such a foolish post,next Time I'll scan it carefully before post my questions,Thank @Henning Makholm –  Lanston Aug 30 '11 at 15:09
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Try this where you actually declare a parameter for the function so that i gets a local definition inside the function:

for(var i = 0, len = btns.length; i < len; i++) {
    (function(i){
        btns[i].addEventListener('click',function(e){
            console.log(i);
        },false);
    })(i);
}

As you had it, you were passing i as a parameter to the function, but not actually defining it as a parameter so the passed one was not being used. This is one reason why it's a bad idea to use the same name because these types of mistakes won't make a javascript error. I'd prefer this with a different name for the internal variable so there's no chance of confusion between the two:

for(var i = 0, len = btns.length; i < len; i++) {
    (function(loopVar){
        btns[loopVar].addEventListener('click',function(e){
            console.log(loopVar);
        },false);
    })(i);
}

You can see this work here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/Hb5t3/

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Did you mean btns[i] or btns[loopVar] in your last example? –  Phillip Jan 23 '12 at 1:56
    
@cf_PhillipSenn - Yes, I corrected it. Thanks. –  jfriend00 Jan 23 '12 at 5:30
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