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I've done a few searches and I'm unable to find a suitable answer. Basically I have an unordered list which can be of a varying length. I want to iterate through the list, do some other things and then come back and select the next item on the list. I can do this fine when I define the amount of times my loop should iterate as I know the amount of items in the list.

However I don't want to define this for each test, I want to grab the number of items in the list and then pop that into a variable that I can use to exit the loop and do the next thing I want.

The HTML is like so:

<ul id="PageContent_cat">
  <li class="sel">
    <a target="_self" href="/searchlocation.aspx?c=S1">S1</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a target="_self" href="/searchlocation.aspx?c=S2">S2</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a target="_self" href="/searchlocation.aspx?c=S3">S3</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a target="_self" href="/searchlocation.aspx?c=S4">S4</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a target="_self" href="/searchlocation.aspx?c=S5">S5</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a target="_self" href="/searchlocation.aspx?c=S6">S6</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a target="_self" href="/searchlocation.aspx?c=S7">S7</a>
  </li>
</ul>

So I can see there are 7 items in the list. Apparently in watir I could have used something the following:

arr= ie.select_list(:name,'lr').getAllContents.to_a

But not with webdriver.

I thought I could maybe use 'lis' but I just get a Hex result:

$bob = browser.ul(:id => "PageContent_cat").lis puts $bob

Thanks,

Paul

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So, it turns out that I just use: $bob = browser.ul(:id => "PageContent_cat").lis.length puts $bob Which returns 7. –  Paul Coles Aug 30 '11 at 15:36
    
that's brute force and ugyl.. See Adam's answer below –  Chuck van der Linden Aug 30 '11 at 20:34
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Depending on the information you're wanting to gather and what purpose you're going to put it to, here is the way that is typically done. Rather than getting a number to define your iterations and THEN iterating that number of times, you can have it stop naturally when it reaches the last element:

MyList = browser.ul(:id => "PageContent_cat")

#Scrape links from the UL for visiting
MyList.links.each do |link|
  puts link
  puts link.text
  b.goto(link)
  #etc
end

#Save li items to an array for later processing
MyArray = []

MyList.lis.each do |li|
  puts li.text
  MyArray << li.text
  #etc
end

#Iterate through your array in the same method, to report/visit/etc
MyArray.each do |item|
  puts "I collected something: #{item}"
  b.goto(item)
end #
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+1 This is the ruby way to do this kind of thing, using .each Easier to code and it's a lot cleaner and easier to read, it's why the .each method was put there, because so very often we need to do some operation for each element of a collection –  Chuck van der Linden Aug 30 '11 at 20:33
2  
You are better off using collect to collect the li text: MyList.lis.collect { |li | li.text } provides an array –  Alister Scott Aug 31 '11 at 2:05
    
Ok, I'll give that a go. I'm only really starting out doing this, so to me the 'ugly' route was the only one that I worked out how to do. –  Paul Coles Aug 31 '11 at 12:30
    
@Alister, thanks for that, always nice to have a one-liner. –  adam reed Aug 31 '11 at 15:48
    
@Paul - your approach made sense, but Ruby is good at providing simplified solutions for common purposes. Like Alister's suggestion to me above, there's always an alternative way to do things. –  adam reed Aug 31 '11 at 15:48
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puts browser.ul(:id => "PageContent_cat").lis.length

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