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First, my apologies for a long question. I was looking for a script that would itemize by character everything in a file. I came across a script and decided to expand it to show control characters and unicode. Below is my attempt at this, but it is not totally correct. So I'm asking for some help. I've been researching how to read a file in UTF-8 properly, lots of comments on how not to do it, but few on a method that works for me.

Using a .DS_Store file from my mac I get the following output. I'd like to understand how to resolve the warnings (i.e. not just ignore them, but to properly process them). I'm also looking for a way to verify that I'm doing this right. E.g. od -c .DS_Store is one method, but I'm not seeing a one-to-one match to my output.

>charlist_v4 .DS_Store
utf8 "\x80" does not map to Unicode at /Users/ericdp/bin/charlist_v4 line 210.
utf8 "\x80" does not map to Unicode at /Users/ericdp/bin/charlist_v4 line 210.
utf8 "\x80" does not map to Unicode at /Users/ericdp/bin/charlist_v4 line 210.
utf8 "\x80" does not map to Unicode at /Users/ericdp/bin/charlist_v4 line 210.
utf8 "\x80" does not map to Unicode at /Users/ericdp/bin/charlist_v4 line 210.
utf8 "\x80" does not map to Unicode at /Users/ericdp/bin/charlist_v4 line 210.
               Dec     Hex  Letter   Count  Desc

     1       0  0x0000  [NUL]        6,020  C0 Control Character Set - Null (^@ \0)                                         
     2       1  0x0001  [SOH]           59  C0 Control Character Set - Start of Header (^A)                                 
     3       2  0x0002  [STX]            8  C0 Control Character Set - Start of Text (^B)                                   
     4       3  0x0003  [ETX]            1  C0 Control Character Set - End of Text (^C)                                     
     5       4  0x0004  [EOT]            7  C0 Control Character Set - End of Transmission (^D)                             
     6       8  0x0008  [BS]             9  C0 Control Character Set - Backspace (^H \b)                                    
     7      11  0x000B  [VT]             2  C0 Control Character Set - Vertical Tabulation (^K \v)                          
     8      16  0x0010  [DLE]            9  C0 Control Character Set - Data Line Escape (^P)                                
     9      24  0x0018  [CAN]            1  C0 Control Character Set - Cancel (^X)                                          
    10      32  0x0020  [SP]             7  Space                                                                           
    11      37  0x0025  [%]          2  PERCENT SIGN                                                                    
    12      48  0x0030  [ ]          6  DIGIT ZERO                                                                      
    13      49  0x0031  [1]          1  DIGIT ONE                                                                       
    14      56  0x0038  [8]          6  DIGIT EIGHT                                                                     
    15      64  0x0040  [@]          7  COMMERCIAL AT                                                                   
    16      66  0x0042  [B]          2  LATIN CAPITAL LETTER B                                                          
    17      68  0x0044  [D]          2  LATIN CAPITAL LETTER D                                                          
    18      69  0x0045  [E]          1  LATIN CAPITAL LETTER E                                                          
    19      83  0x0053  [S]          1  LATIN CAPITAL LETTER S                                                          
    20      92  0x005C  [\]          6  REVERSE SOLIDUS                                                                 
    21      96  0x0060  [`]          1  GRAVE ACCENT                                                                    
    22     100  0x0064  [d]          1  LATIN SMALL LETTER D                                                            
    23     117  0x0075  [u]          1  LATIN SMALL LETTER U                                                            
    24     120  0x0078  [x]          6  LATIN SMALL LETTER X     

  #!/usr/bin/perl
  # ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ==========
  # charlist2.pl
  #
  # count every character in a file
  #
  # Version 1: 16 Aug 05  bb
  # Version 2: 21 Sep 05 jw v2 modified layout of output file
  # Version 3: 2005-10-15 bh Added -f and -r options
  # Version 4: 31 Jan 2010 EDP - added UTF-8 functionality
  # ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ==========
  $| = 1;             # Do not buffer output
  use strict;
  use warnings;
  use Encode qw(encode :fallbacks);


  #use open IO => ':utf8'; # all I/O in utf8
  #no warnings 'utf8'; # but ignore utf-8 warnings
  #binmode( STDIN, ":utf8" );
  #binmode( STDOUT, ":utf8" );
  #binmode( STDERR, ":utf8" );

  use Unicode::UCD 'charinfo';
  use Cwd 'abs_path'; # get full absolute path to files, regardless of where it is ran from
  {
    no warnings;      # warnings doesn't like $0 below
    use constant {
      PROGRAM  => abs_path( $0 ),  # get full path, not relative path
      DEBUG    => $ENV{ 'DEBUG' }  # to turn on debugging:  export DEBUG=1
    };
  }

  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  our $Version = "4.0";


  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  use Getopt::Std;
  our ( $opt_f, $opt_r );
  getopts( 'fr' );

  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  die <<"eof" unless $#ARGV >= 0;
  Usage:
    charlist2.pl [-f] [-r]  infile > outfile

  Given a text file, count the number of times each character occurs.
  Print out the count, also giving the decimal equivalent of each character.

  -f sort by frequency

  -r reverse sort order

  Version $Version
  eof
  my $file = $ARGV[0];
  my %ctrls;




    sub commify {
    # ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
    # Description : commify a number
    #
    # Arguments   : number
    #
    # Returns     : string equivalent with commas every three numbers to the
    #               left of the decimal
    #
    # Example     : $num_str = commify 1234.5678  # == 1,234.5678
    # ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------

      my $text = reverse $_[0];
      $text =~ s/(\d\d\d)(?=\d)(?!\d*\.)/$1,/g;
      return scalar reverse $text;

    } # commify


    sub trim {
    # ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
    # Description : Trim spaces before and after a string
    #
    # Arguments   : string
    #
    # Returns     : regex out any leading/trailing spaces
    #
    # Example     : print trim( '     a  ' )  # 'a'
    # ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------

      my ( $str ) = shift =~ m!^\s*(.+?)\s*$!i;
      defined $str ? return $str : return '';

    } # trim

    sub ident {
    # ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
    # Description : Identify everything about this character
    #
    # Arguments   : line counter
    #               character code (i.e. space = 32)
    #               count of how many we found
    #
    # Returns     : output line to STDOUT
    #
    # Example     : ident( line_num=>$cnt,
    #                      char_code=>$idx,
    #                      count=>$count[$idx] );
    # ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------

    my %args = @_;
    my $line_num = $args{line_num} || die 'ident( line_num=> ) paramer required';
    my $char_code = $args{char_code} ;#|| die 'ident( char_code=> ) paramer required';
    my $count = $args{count} || die 'ident( count=> ) paramer required';

    my ( $c, $h, $n );

    # ---------- ---------- ----------
    # Gather what unicode information about this character
    # ---------- ---------- ----------
    my $info=eval { charinfo( $char_code ) };

    # ---------- ---------- ----------
    # and we find something
    # ---------- ---------- ----------
    if ( defined $info )
    {

      # ---------- ---------- ----------
      # what if it is one of the control
      # characters defined at the end of
      # this file?
      # ---------- ---------- ----------
      if ( defined $ctrls{$char_code} )
      {

        $c = trim( $ctrls{$char_code}[0] );
        $h = $info->{code};
        $n = trim( $ctrls{$char_code}[1] );

      }
      else
      {

        # ---------- ---------- ----------
        # what did we find?
        # ---------- ---------- ----------
        $c = chr( $char_code ) || ' ';
        eval {

          no warnings;
          if ( $info->{combining} > 0 )
          {
            $c = ' ' . $c;
          }

        };
        $h = $info->{code} || ' ';
        $n = trim( $info->{name} ) || ' ';

      }

    }
    else
    {

      # ---------- ---------- ----------
      # we didn't find anything in the system files.
      # it may not be up-to-date
      # ---------- ---------- ----------
      $n = '<undef>';

    }
    print sprintf( "%6d", $line_num ) . "\t";
    print sprintf( "%6d", $char_code ) ."\t";
    print '0x' . $h . "\t";
    print sprintf( "[%-1s]\t", $c );
    print sprintf( "%10s", commify( $count ) ) . "\t";
    print sprintf( "%-80s", $n );
    print "\n";
    } # ident



  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  # Load special control characters from DATA below
  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  while ( <DATA> )
  {

    chomp;
    last unless /\S/;
    my ( $key, @data ) = split /,/;
    $ctrls{$key} = \@data;

  }



  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  # Read the file
  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  my $line;
  my @count;

  #open( my $fh, '<', $file ) or die "Unable to open $file - $!\n";
  #while ( $line = <$fh> )

  open( my $fh, '<:encoding( UTF-8 )', $file ) or die "Unable to open $file - $!\n";
  while ( $line = encode( 'UTF-8', <$fh>, FB_PERLQQ ) )
  {

    my @chars = split( //, $line );
    foreach my $char ( @chars )
    {

  #    utf8::decode( $char ) or die "unable to change [$char] to utf8";
      $count[ ord( $char ) ]++;

    }

  }
  close $fh or die "Unable to close $file: $!\n";


  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  #  http://unicode.org/faq/utf_bom.html#gen6
  #  1114111 = 0x10FFFF - max possible value in Unicode UTF-8 v.5.2.
  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  my @list = ( 0 .. 1114111 );
  @list = sort { $count[$a] || 0 <=> $count[$b] || 0 } @list if $opt_f;
  @list = reverse @list if $opt_r;

  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  # Show what we found
  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  print "\t   Dec\t   Hex\tLetter\t Count\tDesc\n\n";
  my $cnt = 1;
  for my $idx ( @list )
  {

    if ( $count[$idx] )
    {

      print "line_num=>$cnt\tchar_code=>$idx\tcount=>$count[$idx]\n" if DEBUG;
      ident( line_num=>$cnt,
             char_code=>$idx,
             count=>$count[$idx] );
      $cnt++;

    }

  }

  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  # All done
  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  exit;

  # ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ==========

  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  # These special characters don't have all
  # this extra definition, so let's make this list
  # ---------- ---------- ----------
  __DATA__
  0,NUL,C0 Control Character Set - Null (^@ \0)
  1,SOH,C0 Control Character Set - Start of Header (^A)
  2,STX,C0 Control Character Set - Start of Text (^B)
  3,ETX,C0 Control Character Set - End of Text (^C)
  4,EOT,C0 Control Character Set - End of Transmission (^D)
  5,ENQ,C0 Control Character Set - Enquiry (^E)
  6,ACK,C0 Control Character Set - Acknowledge (^F)
  7,BEL,C0 Control Character Set - Bell(^G \a)
  8,BS,C0 Control Character Set - Backspace (^H \b)
  9,HT,C0 Control Character Set - Horizontal Tabulation (^I \t)
  10,LF,C0 Control Character Set - Line Feed (^J \n)
  11,VT,C0 Control Character Set - Vertical Tabulation (^K \v)
  12,FF,C0 Control Character Set - Form Feed (^L \f)
  13,CR,C0 Control Character Set - Carriage Return (^M \r)
  14,SO,C0 Control Character Set - Shift Out (^N)
  15,SI,C0 Control Character Set - Shift In (^O)
  16,DLE,C0 Control Character Set - Data Line Escape (^P)
  17,DC1,C0 Control Character Set - Device Control One (^Q) - XON
  18,DC2,C0 Control Character Set - Device Control Two (^R)
  19,DC3,C0 Control Character Set - Device Control Three (^S) - XOFF
  20,DC4,C0 Control Character Set - Device Control Four (^T)
  21,NAK,C0 Control Character Set - Negative Acknowledge (^U)
  22,SYN,C0 Control Character Set - Synchronous Idle (^V)
  23,ETB,C0 Control Character Set - End of Transmission Block (^W)
  24,CAN,C0 Control Character Set - Cancel (^X)
  25,EM,C0 Control Character Set - End of Medium (^Y)
  26,SUB,C0 Control Character Set - Substitute (^Z)
  27,ESC,C0 Control Character Set - Escape (^[, \e)
  28,FS,C0 Control Character Set - File Separator (^\)
  29,GS,C0 Control Character Set - Group Separator (^])
  30,RS,C0 Control Character Set - Record Separator (^^)
  31,US,C0 Control Character Set - Unit Separator (^_)
  32,SP,Space
  127,DEL,Delete (^?)
  128,PAD,C1 Control Character Set - Padding Character
  129,HOP,C1 Control Character Set - High Octet Preset
  130,BPH,C1 Control Character Set - Break Permitted Here
  131,NBH,C1 Control Character Set - No Break Here
  132,IND,C1 Control Character Set - Index
  133,NEL,C1 Control Character Set - Next Line
  134,SSA,C1 Control Character Set - Start of Selected Area
  135,ESA,C1 Control Character Set - End of Selected Area
  136,HTS,C1 Control Character Set - Horizontal Tabulation Set
  137,HTJ,C1 Control Character Set - Horizontal Tabulation with Justification
  138,VTS,C1 Control Character Set - Vertical Tabulation Set
  139,PLD,C1 Control Character Set - Partial Line Down
  140,PLU,C1 Control Character Set - Partial Line Up
  141,RI,C1 Control Character Set - Reverse Index
  142,SS2,C1 Control Character Set - Single-Shift Two
  143,SS3,C1 Control Character Set - Single-Shift Three
  144,DCS,C1 Control Character Set - Device Control String
  145,PU1,C1 Control Character Set - Private Use One
  146,PU2,C1 Control Character Set - Private Use Two
  147,STS,C1 Control Character Set - Set Transmit State
  148,CCH,C1 Control Character Set - Cancel Character
  149,MW,C1 Control Character Set - Message Waiting
  150,SPA,C1 Control Character Set - Start of Guarded Protected Area
  151,EPA,C1 Control Character Set - End of Guarded Protected Area
  152,SOS,C1 Control Character Set - Start of String
  153,SGCI,C1 Control Character Set - Single Graphic Character Introducer
  154,SCI,C1 Control Character Set - Single Character Introducer
  155,CSI,C1 Control Character Set - Control Sequence Introducer
  156,ST,C1 Control Character Set - String Terminator
  157,OSC,C1 Control Character Set - Operating System Command
  158,PM,C1 Control Character Set - Privacy Message
  159,APC,C1 Control Character Set - Application Program Command
  __END__

  # ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ========== ==========
share|improve this question
1  
Bytes are not characters, you know. They only become characters once decoded. Otherwise you don’t know which character the byte represents. Byte 0x92 is U+00ED LATIN SMALL LETTER I WITH ACUTE in MacRoman, but that same 0x92 byte it is U+2019 RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK in Windows-1252, while it is U+2593 DARK SHADE in koi8-r, U+0092 PRIVATE USE TWO in Latin1, etc. –  tchrist Aug 30 '11 at 18:23
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2 Answers

Trivial Answer

Here’s a general outline. Never do your own manual decoding! The only time I have ever had to do that was processing a file where the encoding varied from one line to the next. Instead, always set the encoding on the stream, whether via one of these ways:

  • The PERLUNICODE envariable: standard S for std{in,out,err} and dangerous D for files
  • The use open pragma.
  • In the mode argument to 3⁺‐arg open.
  • In the second argument to binmode.

Here’s a general outline:

use warnings;
use warnings FATAL => "utf8";
use charnames ();
my %seen = ();
binmode(STDOUT, ":utf8") || die "binmode failed";
binmode(STDIN, ":encoding(UTF-8)") || die "binmode failed";

while (<STDIN>) {
    $seen{$_}++ for split //;
}
close(STDIN) || die "can't close STDIN: $!";

Now you have a %seen hash that is indexed by each character who whose associated value is the instance count.

Simple Answer

This is a full solution that assumes all input is UTF-8. It makes pretty output that you can sort on different columns if you don’t like code point order.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
#
# unicount - count code points in input
# Tom Christiansen <tchrist@perl.com>

use v5.12;
use strict;
use sigtrap;
use warnings;
use open qw( :encoding(UTF-8) :std );
use charnames ();

use List::Util          qw(max);
use Unicode::UCD        qw(charinfo charblock);

my $total = 0;
my %seen = ();

while (<>) {
    $total += length;
    $seen{$_}++ for split //;
};

my $dec_width = length($total);
my $hex_width = max(4, length sprintf("%x", max map { ord } keys %seen));

for (sort keys %seen) {
    my $count = $seen{$_};
    my $gcat  = charinfo(ord())->{category};
    my $name  = charnames::viacode(ord())
             || "<unnamed code point in @{[charblock(ord())]}>";

    printf "%*d U+%0*X GC=%2s %s\n",
            $dec_width => $count,
            $hex_width => ord(),
            $gcat      => $name;
}

exit;

Extravagant Answer

This no longer assumes input is UTF-8.

  • It trims off .gz type extensions using magic open.
  • It looks inside podfiles for an embedded =encoding. This could be extended to html and xml files.
  • If files have an extension that matches a valid encoding alias, then use that encoding. For example, foo.latin1, foo.utf8, foo.cp1252, foo.utf16, foo.utf16be, foo.macroman. I strongly believe there is no such thing as a plain textfile and that consequently the .txt extension should therefore be forthwith banned from use.
  • Otherwise bytes is assumed for binary files and utf8 otherwise.

The procesing could be by line instead of wholefile, but that I leave as an excercise for the reader.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
#
# unicount - count code points in input
# Tom Christiansen <tchrist@perl.com>

use v5.12;
use strict;
use sigtrap;
use warnings;
use charnames ();

use Carp                qw(carp croak confess cluck);
use List::Util          qw(max);
use Unicode::UCD        qw(charinfo charblock);

sub fix_extension;
sub process_input   (&) ;
sub set_encoding    (*$);
sub yuck            ($) ;

my $total = 0;
my %seen = ();

# deep magic here
process_input {
    $total += length;
    $seen{$_}++ for split //;
};

my $dec_width = length($total);
my $hex_width = max(4, length sprintf("%x", max map { ord } keys %seen));

for (sort keys %seen) {
    my $count = $seen{$_};
    my $gcat  = charinfo(ord())->{category};
    my $name  = charnames::viacode(ord())
             || "<unnamed code point in @{[charblock(ord())]}>";

    printf "%*d U+%0*X GC=%2s %s\n",
            $dec_width => $count,
            $hex_width => ord(),
            $gcat      => $name;
}

exit;

##################################################

sub yuck($) {
    my $errmsg = $_[0];
    $errmsg =~ s/(?<=[^\n])\z/\n/;
    print STDERR "$0: $errmsg";
}

sub process_input(&) {
    my $function = shift();
    my $enc;

    if (@ARGV == 0 && -t STDIN && -t STDERR) {
        print STDERR "$0: reading from stdin, type ^D to end or ^C to kill.\n";
    }

    unshift(@ARGV, "-") if @ARGV == 0;

FILE:

    for my $file (@ARGV) {
        # don't let magic open make an output handle
        next if -e $file && ! -f _;
        my $quasi_filename = fix_extension($file);
        $file = "standard input" if $file eq q(-);
        $quasi_filename =~ s/^(?=\s*[>|])/< /;

        no strict "refs";
        my $fh = $file;   # is *so* a lexical filehandle! ###98#
        unless (open($fh, $quasi_filename)) {
            yuck("couldn't open $quasi_filename: $!");
            next FILE;
        }
        set_encoding($fh, $file) || next FILE;

        my $whole_file = eval {
            # could just do this a line at a time, but not if counting \R's
            use warnings "FATAL" => "all";
            local $/;
            scalar <$fh>;
        };

        if ($@) {
            $@ =~ s/ at \K.*? line \d+.*/$file line $./;
            yuck($@);
            next FILE;
        }

        do {
            # much faster to alias than to copy
            local *_ = \$whole_file;
            &$function;
        };

        unless (close $fh) {
            yuck("couldn't close $quasi_filename at line $.: $!");
            next FILE;
        }

    } # foreach file

}

# Encoding set to (after unzipping):
#    if file.pod => use whatever =encoding says
#    elsif file.ENCODING for legal encoding name -> use that one
#    elsif file is binary => use bytes
#    else => use utf8
#
# Note that gzipped stuff always shows up as bytes this way, but
#   it internal unzipped bytes are still counted after unzipping
#
sub set_encoding(*$) {
    my ($handle, $path) = @_;

    my $enc_name = (-f $path && -B $path) ? "bytes" : "utf8";

    if ($path && $path =~ m{ \. ([^\s.]+) \z }x) {
        my $ext = $1;
        die unless defined $ext;

        if ($ext eq "pod") {
            my $int_enc = qx{
                perl -C0 -lan -00 -e 'next unless /^=encoding/; print \$F[1]; exit' $path
            };
            if ($int_enc) {
                chomp $int_enc;
                $ext = $int_enc;
              ##print STDERR "$0: reset encoding to $ext on $path\n";
            }
        }

        require Encode;
        if (my $enc_obj = Encode::find_encoding($ext)) {
            my $name = $enc_obj->name || $ext;
            $enc_name = "encoding($name)";
        }
    }

    return 1 if eval {
        use warnings FATAL => "all";
        no strict "refs";
      ##print STDERR qq(binmode($handle, ":$enc_name")\n);
        binmode($handle, ":$enc_name") || die "binmode to $enc_name failed";
        1;
    };

    for ($@) {
        s/ at .* line \d+\.//;
        s/$/ for $path/;
    }

    yuck("set_encoding: $@");

    return undef;
}

sub fix_extension {
    my $path = shift();
    my %Compress = (
        Z       =>  "zcat",
        z       => "gzcat",            # for uncompressing
        gz      => "gzcat",
        bz      => "bzcat",
        bz2     => "bzcat",
        bzip    => "bzcat",
        bzip2   => "bzcat",
        lzma    => "lzcat",
    );

    if ($path =~ m{ \. ( [^.\s] +) \z }x) {
        if (my $prog = $Compress{$1}) {
            # HIP HIP HURRAY! for magic open!!!
            # HIP HIP HURRAY! for magic open!!!
            # HIP HIP HURRAY! for magic open!!!
            return "$prog $path |";
        }
    }

    return $path;
}

END {
    close(STDIN)  || die "couldn't close stdin: $!";
    close(STDOUT) || die "couldn't close stdout: $!";
}

UNITCHECK {
    $SIG{  PIPE  } = sub { exit };
    $SIG{__WARN__} = sub {
        confess "trapped uncaught warning" unless $^S;
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you use the looser ':utf8' for output on purpose? That won't trigger a warning that you can make fatal, I thought. –  brian d foy Aug 30 '11 at 18:37
    
@brian: Yes, I did. It’s faster. And it can generate warnings: perl -CS -le '$SIG{__WARN__} = sub { die "oh shucks" } ; print "\x{FFFF}"' that I can fatalize. –  tchrist Aug 30 '11 at 18:43
    
Thank, this gives me more to think about. –  Eric Peterson Aug 30 '11 at 19:09
    
Huh. That will only die on Perl 5.14 and later. The earlier perls do not warn for that, as I discovered this weekend. –  brian d foy Aug 30 '11 at 23:33
    
Is there a reason not to use utf8::all at least in trivial answer? –  w.k Aug 31 '11 at 13:22
show 1 more comment

Your .DS_Store file contains binary data, not UTF-8 encoded text. The warnings are coming from the fact that certain byte sequences are not valid UTF-8.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, true. But I was hoping to have a script that would read regardless of whether is it binary or not. For example, I get a corrupted data text file from a vendor. I'd like to show all possible values by character. That is why I appended the control characters in my script. Perhaps, I need to check for that range before attempting to decode the unicode value of a character? But how to count them? –  Eric Peterson Aug 30 '11 at 17:34
1  
@EricPeterson: Your best bet in that case would be to read the file in binary mode and decode the UTF-8 manually, falling back to interpreting a sequence as individual bytes if it fails. –  Anomie Aug 30 '11 at 17:44
    
If you are counting characters, you have to decode the file. If you are counting bytes, that is different. You really should not mix the two ideas, because a byte in one file (say a CP1252 vs MacRoman vs NextStep vs ISO-8859-1 vs ISO-8859-7) is not the same character as the same byte in another file. –  tchrist Aug 30 '11 at 18:02
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