Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use Dapper simply to map my database tables to types in C#, however, some of my types need additional elements that are not in the table. To do this I am using a factory that can take column values and set the appropriate properties.

public IEnumerable<IMyType> All() {
  var query = _connection.Query("SELECT * FROM [table]");
  return query.Select(o => _myTypeFactory.Create(o));
}

Currently this is resulting the return statement generating an error:

Cannot convert expression type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<dynamic>' to return type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<IMyType>'

My factory class looks something like this:

public class MyTypeFactory {
  public IMyType Create(dynamic o) {
    return Create((String) o.Code, (Int32) o.KeyID);
  }
  public IMyType Create(String code, Int32 keyID) {
    return new MyType(code, Cache.Lookup(keyID));
  }
}

Why doesn't the Select() method return IEnumerable<IMyType>? What do I need to do to make this work? Is this just the wrong approach and there's a better way?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The simplest fix is just to use the Cast<> LINQ operator:

public IEnumerable<IMyType> All() {
  var query = _connection.Query("SELECT * FROM [table]");
  return query.Select(o => _myTypeFactory.Create(o))
              .Cast<IMyType>();
}

Alternatively, you could cast each element:

public IEnumerable<IMyType> All() {
  var query = _connection.Query("SELECT * FROM [table]");
  return query.Select(o => (IMyType) _myTypeFactory.Create(o));
}

It doesn't currently work because there's simply no implicit conversion available between IEnumerable<dynamic> and IEnumerable<IMyType>. IEnumerable<dynamic> could be implemented in any number of ways, and given that each item will be generated dynamically there's no reason to suppose the result value will implement IEnumerable<IMyType>.

I agree that it looks like the second form isn't actually adding anything, but the compiler doesn't check all the possible return types of _myTypeFactory.Create(o) - it treats that whole expression as a dynamic value, i.e. the expression is of type dynamic. Therefore the Select result is still of type IEnumerable<dynamic>.

Another option is to specify the generic type argument to Select.

public IEnumerable<IMyType> All() {
  var query = _connection.Query("SELECT * FROM [table]");
  return query.Select<IMyType>(o => _myTypeFactory.Create(o));
}

That's attempting to force the lambda expression to a Func<dynamic, IMyType> - I believe that will work...

EDIT: As noted in comments, forcing the method invocation to be resolved at compile-time will fix it too. Basically it depends what you find most readable.

share|improve this answer
    
@Hellfire: I'm glad it makes sense to you - it took me a few attempts to work it out myself :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '11 at 18:39
    
Thanks Jon. Once you explain it, it makes perfect sense. Casting does indeed work and is pretty enough for my purposes. The third option does not. –  Doug Wilson Aug 30 '11 at 18:42
    
The casting to IMyType is a red hering though, you don't actually need to dynamically invoke MyTypeFactory.Create(dynamic o) in this case. You only need it for accessing the properties which is done inside of Create. –  jbtule Aug 30 '11 at 18:42
    
@jbtule: It's not really a red herring - it's just an alternative. I agree that either the call can be made non-dynamic or the result can be cast - either will work fine. –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '11 at 18:44
    
@jon-skeet, let me put it a different way. Dapper is using dynamic because it's properties are determined at runtime, it has dynamic behavior. It is Dapper's declaration of dynamic which is causing Create to be invoked dynamically, but there's nothing new to be discovered at runtime, and it clearly wasn't the intent given the question. Adding a cast to the interface makes the code work, but if the intent is not for dynamic behavior does that make sense? –  jbtule Aug 30 '11 at 23:37

The best fix is probably to remove the dynamic invocation from the select statement then you'll get your expected static type IEnumerable<IMyType>.

public IEnumerable<IMyType> All() {
  var query = _connection.Query("SELECT * FROM [table]");
  return query.Select(o => _myTypeFactory.Create((Object)o)); //cast dynamic type to Object
}

OR

public IEnumerable<IMyType> All() {
      IEnumerable<object> query = _connection.Query("SELECT * FROM [table]"); //IEnumerable<dynamic> is the same as IEnumerable<object>
      return query.Select(o => _myTypeFactory.Create(o)); 
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.