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Just bumped into a statement that works in SSMS, but produces an error when executed from C#:

create table    dbo.tb_Role
(
    idRole  smallint not null identity( 1, 1 )
        constraint xp_Role primary key clustered,
    sRole   varchar( 16 ) not null,
    s_Role  as lower( sRole )           -- automatic lower-case
        constraint  xu_Role unique,     -- enforce name uniqueness
    ..
)

Earlier in a similar case I always used a unique index on sRole without an additional computed column. Recently I realized that this approach will allow both 'Admins' and 'admins'. Wanting to do things properly, I added s_Role. But my install engine (written in C#) surprisingly choked on that statement, showing a SqlException:

CREATE TABLE failed because the following SET options have incorrect settings: 'QUOTED_IDENTIFIER'. Verify that SET options are correct for use with indexed views and/or indexes on computed columns and/or filtered indexes and/or query notifications and/or XML data type methods and/or spatial index operations. Could not create constraint. See previous errors.

If I comment out s_Role column (and xu_Role constraint) install executes the script perfectly, so the error is triggered by that column definition.

I have two questions:

1) SSMS is also a .NET application - same as my install engine. Why is the behavior different? Can't use profiler since it's an Express Edition..

If the difference is about default connection properties (specifically, QUOTED_IDENTIFIER), SSMS has the default set to ON (confirmed in Tools|Options|QueryExecution|SQLServer|ANSI), and MSDN says this option is ON by default [for new connections].
I never modify any options in the SqlConnection objects that I use, so what gives?

2) There are no quoted identifiers in that column definition, so what's the complaint about? Yes, I see "..indexes on computed columns", but I just tried wrapping that entire CREATE TABLE in SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON|OFF in SSMS and then flipped them - OFF|ON. Both cases execute in SSMS without any differences or errors! So, even if I explicitly turn if OFF, SSMS executes this CREATE successfully..

The next thing to try is add same wrap into the install script. I'll add results in a jiffy. My environment: VS2010, .NET4 (tho same code would run on 2.0), SQL 2008 Express (sure that same would occur on R2).

If anyone has an explanation, I will very much appreciate sharing!

share|improve this question
    
Use DBCC USEROPTIONS (or profiler if you prefer) to find out the actual runtime settings from SSMS –  gbn Aug 30 '11 at 18:43
    
Ok guys, the consensus is that somehow connection options must be different between SSMS and .NET. I agree that this seems to be the only logical explanation. Also confirmed by running a set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF create table.. batch in SSMS - produces the same exact error. In the original test I was "wrapping" CREATE TABLE in SET OFF|ON and executing the whole batch, but now I got a clear understanding why it worked: these options are like #precompiler directives in C/C++, they get evaluated before command execution and it looks as if ON overrides OFF irrelevant of order. –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 20:33
    
However, upon logging results of "dbcc useroptions" command through a SqlConnection object in .NET the record shows "quoted_identifier=SET" among others!! So what's wrong? As I said, i'm not setting any options in the code, and the install script only sets XACT_ABORT. I'll add explicit SET..ON right before the CREATE TABLE now. –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 20:38
    
Ok, my bad! I'm a moron )). I found that another script executed previously sets this option to OFF. Well, this makes sense now! Thank you all! Can I mark more than one answer as accepted? –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 20:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You misunderstand SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON

This (and other options) should be ON for indexes on computed columns. A unique constraint is an index. It's to do with ANSI standards and predictable behaviours

When you CREATE TABLE do you explicitly run SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF in SSMS or bvia the menus? You may be seeting it OFF for new connections only.

From .net, run Profiler or execute DBCC USEROPTIONS to see what SET statements are actually issued. You aren't using a DSN or some such are you?

share|improve this answer
    
Possibly. My thought is that this option effectively tells SQL how to parse the incoming statements, is that correct? –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 19:10
    
@Astrogator: it makes "foo" (with quotes) an identifier not a string constant when ON –  gbn Aug 30 '11 at 19:13
    
Thank you! Sorry, comments behave different on [Enter] )) Spent three hours yesterday reading up on unique constraints vs. indexes (1st is a logical, 2nd is physical constructs, but 1st is implemented via 2nd - agreed).. No explicit manipulations to this or other options is made (at least that I know of), and like stated i even tried adding SET..OFF in the same batch - and that worked in SSMS.. DBCC shows SET in SSMS, will try it .NET. –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 19:19
    
Yeah, i get that. But since i don't have anything in quotes (single or double for that matter) why would it even matter? –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 19:21
    
marking yours as it was the first and eventually led me to the root cause. Thank you! –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 20:52

the error message is the key:

CREATE TABLE failed because the following SET options have incorrect settings: 'QUOTED_IDENTIFIER'. Verify that SET options are correct for use with indexed views and/or indexes on computed columns and/or filtered indexes and/or query notifications and/or XML data type methods and/or spatial index operations. Could not create constraint. See previous errors.

when trying to index a computed column, SQL Server is picky about your connection settings.

you are connecting to SQL Server with different settings for SSMS and your .NET program. Their defaults must be different.

try using these settings for both:

SET ANSI_NULLS ON 
SET CURSOR_CLOSE_ON_COMMIT ON 
SET ANSI_NULL_DFLT_ON ON 
SET ANSI_PADDING ON 
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON 
SET ANSI_WARNINGS ON 
SET ARITHABORT ON 
SET CONCAT_NULL_YIELDS_NULL ON 
SET NUMERIC_ROUNDABORT OFF
share|improve this answer

Your syntax looks like it's missing a comma and the column name for the unique constraint:

create table    dbo.tb_Role
(
    idRole  smallint not null identity( 1, 1 ) PRIMARY KEY,
    sRole   varchar( 16 ) not null,
    s_Role  as lower( sRole ),           -- automatic lower-case
        constraint  xu_Role unique (s_Role),     -- enforce name uniqueness
    ..
)
share|improve this answer
    
No, AFAIK this is perfectly legal (and my preferred) way to give explicit names to table constraints built on top of single columns. A "membership" table would have idRole smallint not null constraint fk_UserRole_Role foreign key references tb_Role, for reference column. In your example PK will have auto-generated name, in mine it is explicitly marked as 'xp_Role'. Same thing with xu_Role - it's only using 's_Role' column. But I'll certainly try a "separate" constraint definition for xu_Role as you suggested. –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 19:32
    
I did confirm that "separate" constraint declaration (as opposed to implicit - along with its column) did not make any difference. Now that i know the root cause for my original issue, it shouldn't - as i expected. Once the root cause is corrected both constraint declarations work the same. –  Astrogator Aug 30 '11 at 20:56

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