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I want to undo some changes without removing them from the history, in a group-friendly way. Currently, I have this (* indicates master):

[rev 1] -- [rev 2] -- [rev 3] -- [rev 4] -- [rev 5] -- [*rev 6]

I want to get back to rev 2, but in a way that makes sense. I believe it should look like this:

[rev 1] -- [rev 2] -- [rev 3] -- [rev 4] -- [rev 5] -- [rev 6] -- [*rev 7]
               |                                                   |
               \---------------------------------------------------/

Where rev 7 is the merge of 6 and 2 (and the "merge" is really just "blindly keep rev 2"). No new heads are created. How do I do this?

Thanks in advance.

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Branch rev 2 and then you can merge it back into trunk (rev 6) right away. –  js1568 Aug 30 '11 at 18:40
    
I would think about why I wanted to make my project history misleading. Just create a branch for rev6 and reset master to rev 2. –  antlersoft Aug 30 '11 at 18:45
    
@js1568 That leaves me with [rev 6] still considered 'master' and [rev 7] as the new branch. How do I convert [rev7] to be the master instead? –  Robert Martin Aug 30 '11 at 18:50
    
@antlersoft good idea. Maybe I will end up doing that instead. But I'd still like to know how to do this in git... –  Robert Martin Aug 30 '11 at 18:51
    
@antlersoft Ah. Here is the concern: If the new master doesn't have the old master as an ancestor, won't everyone else get screwed up? –  Robert Martin Aug 30 '11 at 18:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You would

git branch temp
git reset --hard rev2
git reset --soft temp
git add -A
git commit -m "this commit makes all the changes so that the tree at rev7 looks like the tree at rev2"
git branch -d temp

There is a good post by Scott Chacon about the modifiers (hard, soft and mixed) on the reset command and others.

without a temp branch, you could:

git reset --hard rev2
git reset --soft HEAD@{1}
git add -A
git commit -m "this commit makes all the changes so that the tree at rev7 looks like the tree at rev2"

If you want a merge there, you could just:

git merge --no-ff -s ours rev2

(careful, this is different than the recursive strategy with the "ours" option)

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Thanks. After-the-fact, I also found this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/2763006/… which is related but has a different strategy (although somewhat different because he needed to merge, unlike me) –  Robert Martin Aug 30 '11 at 19:11

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