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Given an enumerated type declaration in Delphi such as:

TMyType = (Item1, Item2, Item3);

is there any way to add a fourth item, say Item4, to the enumerate type at runtime so that at some point during the application's execution I have:

TMyType = (Item1, Item2, Item3, Item4);

Or are types fixed in Delphi?

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You 'can't' do this. –  Andreas Rejbrand Aug 30 '11 at 18:50
    
I wonder who ever would want to extend or alter any type during runtime. What purpose would it serve? It just is impossible to chance a type at runtime. I don't think there is a language, even the weakest/dynamically typed, that offers that abbility. –  NGLN Aug 30 '11 at 20:22
    
Do you need this for injection? An update? What kind of items are in this enum? Don't you just need a TList? –  NGLN Aug 30 '11 at 20:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, you 'can't' do this. It is against the way Delphi works. (Recall that Delphi checks your types already at compile time.)

If I were you, I'd not do

TComputerType = (ctDesktop, ctServer, ctLaptop, ctNetbook, ctTablet)

Instead, I'd do

TComputerType = integer;

const
  COMPUTER_TYPE_DESKTOP = 0;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_SERVER = 1;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_LAPTOP = 2;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_NETBOOK = 3;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_TABLET = 4;

I am sure you get why.

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Thank you for the answer, I suspected this was the case but wanted to check anyway. I thought maybe there might have been a RTTI trick. I am now using a list of constants as you suggest. –  rhody Aug 30 '11 at 19:20

You can create a set.

The following example initializes the set with items item1 and item4. After that item5 is added. It shows whether item5 is in the set, before and after adding, so you'll get this output:

FALSE
TRUE

Example:

program Project1;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
uses SysUtils;

type
  TMyType = (Item1, Item2, Item3, Item4, Item5,Item6);
const
  cItems1And4 : set of TMyType = [Item1,Item4];
var
  MyItems:set of TMyType;

begin
  MyItems := cItems1And4;
  WriteLn(Item5 in MyItems);
  Include(MyItems,Item5);
  WriteLn(Item5 in MyItems);
  ReadLn;
end.

...

I wanted to type the following as a comment to Andreases reply, but the comment system doesn't let me properly format stuff..

If you're not stuck with an ancient Delphi, this is probably a better idea:

  TComputerType = record
    const
      Desktop = 0;
      Server = 1;
      Netbook = 2;
      Tabled = 3;
  end;

That makes sure you don't pollute your namespace, and you'll get to use it as if it's a scoped enum:

 TComputerType.Netbook

I usually do it like that nowadays.. You can even create some handy helper-functions or properties in there, for example to convert from and to strings.

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Interesting, it did cross my mind to use sets. I like your suggestion for including the names in a record to avoid namespace clashes. One of the items was actually named tExt which of course clashes with text ! I'm going to use your suggestion, wish I could give you an extra useful point. –  rhody Aug 30 '11 at 19:23
    
I don't get the set idea. After all, sets and enumerations are two different concepts, and, as far as I can imagine, there is never any doubt whether a variable should be of an enum or a set type... –  Andreas Rejbrand Aug 30 '11 at 19:43
    
I'm with Andreas, a set is not a replacement for an enumeration. Here's an enumeration, TAnimal = (Mouse, Fox, Owl, Snake, Gruffalo). Imagine that as a set. What would it mean for something to be both Mouse and Gruffalo? –  David Heffernan Aug 30 '11 at 19:46
1  
FWIW, the newest Delphis allow scoped enums, i.e. in David's example, you'd have to qualify TAnimal.Fox, TAnimal.Owl, etc. These do not pollute the global namespace. I agree with Andreas: a set won't change the problem. Single constants are the way to go, if it must be extendable. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 30 '11 at 20:49
1  
@Rudy: Indeed, I find having {$SCOPEDENUMS ON} a good practice (less confusion, more readable, code-completion works nicer, less namespace pollution), but if you're giving up the type-safety of enums, you should at least consider packing your constants into a struct or a class. It's cleaner and more powerful than global constants if you need properties or custom attributes per item. –  Wouter van Nifterick Aug 30 '11 at 22:03

Types are fixed at compile time in Delphi—it is, after all, a statically typed language.

You can, at compile time, define subranges of an enumeration:

type
  TEnum = (item1, item2, item3, item4);
  TSubRangeEnum = item1..item3;
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Since I cannot yet comment, I will add one addendum to what Andreas suggested that might help if you have many such lists to maintain. Adding a "base" constant for each grouping might help keep them better organized within your code and help with debugging the constants later (assuming each group has a unique base, of course).

TComputerType = integer;

const
  COMPUTER_TYPE_BASE = 100;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_DESKTOP = COMPUTER_TYPE_BASE + 1;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_SERVER = COMPUTER_TYPE_BASE + 2;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_LAPTOP = COMPUTER_TYPE_BASE + 3;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_NETBOOK = COMPUTER_TYPE_BASE + 4;
  COMPUTER_TYPE_TABLET = COMPUTER_TYPE_BASE + 5;
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