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I have tried so many times to get this to compile, what I'd like to do is have an array of names and extensions to be editable via designer, but when editing via designer, it throws the error :

Constructor on type 'Filter' not found.

and on compile:

Code generation for property 'ExtensionList' failed. Error was: 'Type 'Filter' in Assembly 'Testing, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null' is not marked as serializable.'

Can anyone help? This is the code I'm using:

    System.Collections.Generic.List<Filter> InternalExtensions = new System.Collections.Generic.List<Filter>();

    [System.ComponentModel.Description(@"Sets a list of acceptable extensions to view.")]
    public System.Collections.Generic.List<Filter> ExtensionList
    {
        get
        {
            return InternalExtensions;
        }
        set
        {
            InternalExtensions = value;
        }
    }

[Serializable()]
public class Filter : System.Runtime.Serialization.ISerializable
{
    String Name;
    String[] Extensions;

    public Filter()
    {

    }       

    public Filter(System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationInfo info, System.Runtime.Serialization.StreamingContext context)
    {
        info.AddValue("FilterName", Name);
        info.AddValue("FilterExtensions", Extensions);
    }


   public void GetObjectData(System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationInfo info, System.Runtime.Serialization.StreamingContext context)
   {
       Name = (String)info.GetValue("FilterName", typeof(String));
       Extensions = (String[])info.GetValue("FilterExtensions", typeof(String[]));
   }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not sure whether it's all of your problem, but your implementation of ISerializable is the wrong way round. You're meant to populate the object in the constructor, and the SerializationInfo in GetObjectData:

public Filter(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
{
   Name = (String)info.GetValue("FilterName", typeof(String));
   Extensions = (String[])info.GetValue("FilterExtensions", typeof(String[]));
}


public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
{
    info.AddValue("FilterName", Name);
    info.AddValue("FilterExtensions", Extensions);
}

I wouldn't have expected this to cause a problem at compile-time though... what kind of code generation is involved?

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I put that back in the constructor. The problem didn't change. It doesn't stop it from running, it just displays this error message like 6 times and then it compiles. –  Mark Russ Aug 30 '11 at 19:18
    
@Fabian: Do you mean if you build it again it starts to compile? Is it a warning or an actual error? –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '11 at 19:20
    
It is displayed as a messagebox playing the error sound, but the app still compiles. The messagebox appears like 6 or 7 times while it is compiling. Edit: It also does this when I save the project. I'm guessing this is coming from the designer, though it doesn't show this error when opening the property window in the designer, when I press the "add" button, it only complains of having no constructor. –  Mark Russ Aug 30 '11 at 19:23
    
Wow, now that I've saved and reopened Visual Studio, it doesn't complain about anything, but the resX file was screwed up, I manually deleted the key for ExtensionList and the Add button worked, but instead of having the values Name and Extension, the window only accepts the object type. –  Mark Russ Aug 30 '11 at 19:28
    
@Fabian: What happens if you build from the command line with msbuild? –  Jon Skeet Aug 30 '11 at 19:28

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