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There probably is a fairly simple and straight-forward answer for this, but for some reason I can't see it. I need to restrict calling methods from a class only to some methods implemented by derived classes of some interface.

Say I have

class A{
    public:
        static void foo();
};

class myInterface{
    public:
        virtual void onlyCallFooFromHere() = 0;
}

class myImplementation : public myInterface{
    public:
        virtual void onlyCallFooFromHere()
        {
            A::foo(); //this should work
        }
        void otherFoo()
        {
            A::foo(); //i want to get a compilation error here
        }

}

So I should be able to call A::foo only from the method onlyCallFooFromHere()

Is there a way to achieve this? I'm open to any suggestions, including changing the class design.

EDIT:

So... I feel there's a need to further explain the issue. I have a utility class which interacts with a database (mainly updates records) - class A. In my interface (which represents a basic database objects) I have the virtual function updateRecord() from which I call methods from the db utility class. I want to enforce updating the database only in the updateRecord() function of all extending classes and nowhere else. I don't believe this to be a bad design choice, even if not possible. However, if indeed not possible, I would appreciate a different solution.

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4  
Why would you need that? Seems like a terrible design. You can make A members private and use friendships, but friendships are class-wide, you can't allow only one member from myImpl to call it and the other not. –  Cat Plus Plus Aug 30 '11 at 19:09
3  
Why do you need such a weird class design? –  Nawaz Aug 30 '11 at 19:09
    
It's as terrible a design as having friend classes... I merely want to restrict private/protected methods to other methods instead of classes. I could expand on why I need this, but it makes no difference regarding the answer I'm seeking... –  Luchian Grigore Aug 30 '11 at 19:15
    
@Luchian: I'm still wondering, why in the world only C++ programmers demand such class design? Maybe, they think too much? –  Nawaz Aug 30 '11 at 19:18
    
I expanded the question a bit to provide some further info, hope it makes more sense now... –  Luchian Grigore Aug 30 '11 at 19:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

[Disclaimer: this solution will stop Murphy, not Macchiavelli.]

How about:

class DatabaseQueryInterface {
public:
  ~virtual DatabseQueryInterface() = 0;
  virtual Query compileQuery() const = 0; // or whatever
  virtual ResultSet runQuery(const Query&) const = 0; // etc
};

class DatabaseUpdateInterface : public DatabaseQueryInterface {
public:
   virtual Update compileUpdate() const = 0; // whatever
};

class DatabaseObject {
public:
  virtual ~DatabaseObject() = 0;
protected:
  virtual void queryRecord(const DatabaseQueryInterface& interface) = 0;
  virtual void updateRecord(const DatabaseUpdateInterface& interface) = 0;
};

class SomeConcreteDatabaseObject : public DatabaseObject {
  protected:
     virtual void updateRecord(const DatabaseUpdateInterface& interface) {
        // gets to use interface->compileUpdate()
     }

     virtual void queryRecord(const DatabaseQueryInterface& interface) {
        // only gets query methods, no updates
     }
};

So the basic idea is that your DatabaseObject base class squirrels away a private Query object and a private Update object and when it comes time to call the protected members of the subclass it hands off the Update interface to the updateRecord() method, and the Query interface to the queryRecord() method.

That way the natural thing for the subclasses is to use the object they are passed to talk to the database. Of course they can always resort to dirty tricks to store away a passed-in Update object and try to use it later from a query method, but frankly if they go to such lengths, they're on their own.

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Change the class design - what you want is impossible.

I am unsure of what you are trying to achieve with so little details and I am unable to comment further.

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This would be better suited as a comment. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 30 '11 at 19:13
2  
@Luchian: If he thinks what you want is impossible, then it's an answer. +1 –  Nawaz Aug 30 '11 at 19:14

You could split your project into different TUs:

// A.h
class A
{
public:
    static void foo();
};


// My.h
class myInterface
{
public:
    virtual void onlyCallFooFromHere() = 0;
}

class myImplementation : public myInterface
{
public:
    virtual void onlyCallFooFromHere();
    void otherFoo();
};


// My-with-A.cpp
#include "My.h"
#include "A.h"

void myImplementation::onlyCallFooFromHere() { /* use A */ }


// My-without-A.cpp
#include "My.h"

void myImplementation::otherFoo() { /* no A here */ }
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This solution is like: Use qualified name aspace::A::f() to work; and unqualified name to not work. –  Nawaz Aug 30 '11 at 19:12
    
I never claimed it was pretty, or that the design made sense :-) –  Kerrek SB Aug 30 '11 at 19:16
    
Also, you could physically withhold the A.h file (and its super-secret prime-factorizing quantum algorithm?) from your external-hire team that implements onlyCallFooFromHere() if you really wanted... I mean, it still doesn't make sense, but sometimes it's fun to explore... –  Kerrek SB Aug 30 '11 at 19:18
    
Kerrek SB - I agree - Trouble is with designs that do not make sense - some poor person has to figure it out in the maintence phase. C++ gives you ample rope to hang yourself with - if you chose to do so! –  Ed Heal Aug 30 '11 at 19:21

You probably know this, but with inheritance, you can have public, protected, and private member access.

If a member is private in the base class, the derived cannot access it, while if that same member is protected, then the derived class can access it (while it still isn't public, so you're maintaining encapsulation).

There's no way to stop specific functions from being able to see whats available in their scope though (which is what you're asking), but you can design your base class so that the derived classes can only access specific elements of it.

This could be useful because class B could inherit from class A as protected (thus getting its protected members) while class C could inherit from the same class A as public (thus not getting access to its protected members). This will let you get some form of call availability difference at least -- between classes though, not between functions in the same class.

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your idea won't work. If C inherits from A, it will be able to access A's protected members. Whether C inherits publically, protectedly or privately from A only impacts those using or deriving from C, not the implementation of C itself. –  Lambdageek Aug 30 '11 at 19:56

This could work.

class myInterface;

class A {
    private:
        friend class myInterface;
        static void foo();
};

class myInterface {
    public:
        virtual void onlyCallFooFromHere() {callFoo();}
    protected:
        void callFoo() {A::foo();}
};

Though at this point I think I'd just make A::foo a static of myInterface. The concerns aren't really separate anymore.

class myInterface {
    protected:
        static void foo();
};

Is there a reason foo is in A?

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