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Is there a way to find JavaScript variable on the page (get it as an object) by its name? Variable name is available as a string constant.

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See also later question with additional answers: stackoverflow.com/questions/5117127/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/1664282/… –  goodeye May 23 '13 at 15:56

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted
<script>
var a ="test";
alert(a);
alert(window["a"]);
alert(eval("a"));
</script>
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20  
Please don’t use eval for this. –  Mathias Bynens Feb 20 '12 at 13:11
    
What about non-global variables? Is there any other option but eval? –  mxro Jan 24 at 2:15
    
@mxro: In that situation, you'd want to use an object property. –  T.J. Crowder yesterday

All JS objects (which variables are) are available within their scope as named properties of their parent object. Where no explicit parent exists, it is implicitly the window object.

i.e.:

var x = 'abc';
alert(window['x']); //displays 'abc'

and for a complex object:

var x = {y:'abc'};
alert(x['y']); //displays 'abc'

and this can be chained:

var x = {y:'abc'};
alert(window['x']['y']); //displays 'abc'
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3  
that's only true for globally scoped variables - if the scope is function-level, there's no object which allows access to the lexical environment –  Christoph Apr 7 '09 at 12:15
    
Sure, but nothing helps you there. This assumes you can express the var as a dot notation construct. –  annakata Apr 7 '09 at 12:46
    
If you need to do it within a function, the only solution is to put your vars in an objection, and access the object's keys, like this example: stackoverflow.com/questions/4109297/… –  Juan Mendes Feb 12 '11 at 1:27
    
@Juan - that wouldn't be function level scope though. –  annakata Feb 14 '11 at 7:38
2  
that's the point of my comment. You can't do it to local functions without eval. –  Juan Mendes Feb 18 '11 at 17:14

If you are wanting a variable that is declared in the global context, it is attached to the window object. ex: window["variableName"]. All variables are a hash table value within their scope.

If you have to use dotted notation, then you will want to follow kennebec's suggestion, to navigate through the object hierarchy. eval() can work as well, but is a more expensive operation than is probably needed.

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If your string references a 'deep' property of a global, like 'Yankee.console.format' you can step through the references:

String.prototype.deref= function(){
    // remove leading and trailing quotes and spaces
    var obj= this.replace(/(^[' "]+|[" ']+$)/g,'');

    var M= obj.match(/(^[\w\$]+(\.[\w\$]+)*)/);
    if(M){
    	M= M[1].split('.');
    	obj= window[M.shift()];
    	while(obj && M.length) obj= obj[M.shift()];
    }	
    return obj || this;
}
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var getVar = function (obj) {
    for(var key in this) {
        if(obj === this[key]) return key;
    }
};

foo = 'foo';

console.log( getVar(foo) ); // => 'foo'

http://stackoverflow.com/a/17432007/1250044

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double foo do helps to follow –  Luis Siquot yesterday

You could use eval()

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1  
never ever use eval where you don't have to –  annakata Apr 7 '09 at 10:03
1  
vote up. simple question deserves a simple answer. i'd go with eval() if I for whatever reason needed to look at the contents of a variable by its name. –  Peter Perháč Apr 7 '09 at 10:14
3  
A). what's not simple about window[foo]? B). speed and security don't concern you then? eval is toxic, seriously –  annakata Apr 7 '09 at 10:17
    
I second "annakata". –  Steve Harrison Apr 7 '09 at 10:21
    
I third annakata. –  bobince Apr 7 '09 at 11:17

Javascript variables aren't "on the page", like DOM elements. You can access them only if they are available from your scope.

What are you trying to do?

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Actually in most respects JS variables very much are available as if they were in the DOM –  annakata Apr 7 '09 at 10:08
    
You can access them from outside of your scope? How can you find the parent object of an object, without knowing it in advance? You can't (there can be multiple). In which way are they similar to DOM elements? –  Jaka Jančar Apr 7 '09 at 10:39
    
Bear in mind that JS is mostly what you'd call public scoped, that the window object is the root for JS objects, and that the OP already has the "path" to the variable. –  annakata Apr 7 '09 at 12:16
    
I understood that he only had a name (e.g. he knew that a variable named "my_foo_bar_index" was being used somewhere). Well, ok :) –  Jaka Jančar Apr 7 '09 at 13:21
    
Yeah, he'd be screwed if that were the case :) –  annakata Apr 7 '09 at 15:18

If it's a global variable, you can look it up by name on the global object, since global variables are properties of the global object. On browsers, there's a global variable that refers to the global object called window, so:

var name = "foo";
window.foo = 42;
alert(Number(window[name])); // 42

But global variables are a Bad Thing(tm).

To do this without globals, use your own object:

var name = "foo";
var obj = {};
obj.foo = 42;
alert(Number(obj[name])); // 42

Both of the above work because in JavaScript, you can refer to an object property either with dot notation and a literal (obj.foo), or with bracketed notation and a string (obj["foo"]), and in the latter case, the string can be the result of any expression, including a variable lookup.

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