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For example, can I do the following

@Stateless
@LocalBean
public class MyBean extends AbstractFacade<MyBeanEntity>
{   @PersistenceContext(UnitName='myPU")
    private EntityManager em;

    @EJB
    private MyBean2 bean2;
    @EJB
    private MyBean3 bean3;

    ....

}

For MyBean2 and MyBean3, they look like this

public class MyBean2 extends AbstractFacade<MyBean2Entity>
{   @PersistenceContext(UnitName='myPU")
        private EntityManager em;

        ....

}

public class MyBean3 extends AbstractFacade<MyBean3Entity>
{   @PersistenceContext(UnitName='myPU")
    private EntityManager em;

        ....

}

I need to do this because myBean need to call some business logic implemented in myBean2 and myBean3. But I am not sure if this will work or how the whole "@EJB bean injection" works in this situation. Any thoughts? Thanks alot!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sure you should have no problem using @EJB within another EJB. Make sure you have @Local on top of your second bean class.

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thanks Quynh. Can you explain a little bit on how/where I should use this @Local annotation and why do i need it? –  neo Aug 31 '11 at 14:26
    
Actually, it was my bad. You don't need the "@Local" annotation because you are using your EJB locally instead of exposing it to remote service where you would need to specify "@Local" or "@Remote". In your case scenario, just add "@Stateless" to your MyBean2. Then in your MyBean1 just do "@EJB" above your MyBean declaration. –  Infinity Aug 31 '11 at 17:51

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