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for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
    var thisId = dropId+i;
    $("#p"+thisId).animate({ left:"+=32px" }, function(){
        if ($("#p"+thisId).position().left == 1024) {
            $("#p"+thisId).remove();
            window.console.log("removed");
        }
    });
}

In the above code example, by the time I get around to executing animate's complete function, thisId represents the last assigned value from the for loop NOT the value that I wanted to pass in for each iteration of the loop. Is there a way to get it to access the correct thisId?

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

JavaScript does not have block scope. You can create a new scope by calling a function. E.g.

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
    (function(thisId) {
        $("#p"+thisId).animate({ left:"+=32px" }, function(){
            if ($("#p"+thisId).position().left == 1024) {
                $("#p"+thisId).remove();
                window.console.log("removed");
            }
        });
    }(dropId+i)); // <-- calling the function expression and passing `dropId+i`
}

Variables declarations area always hoisted to the top of the function. So even if you have the declaration inside the loop, it is actually the same as:

var i, thisId;
for(...) {
    thisId = dropId + i;
    //...
}

Every closure you create inside the loop references the same thisId. It's like in Highlander: "There can be only one."

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Genius! That worked. Thanks! –  RyJ Aug 30 '11 at 21:04
1  
+1 For a great answer and a Highlander reference. –  FishBasketGordo Aug 30 '11 at 21:18
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You need to use a closure around the current thisId.

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
    var thisId = dropId+i,
        complete = (function(id) {
            return function() {
                if ($("#p"+id).position().left == 1024) {
                    $("#p"+id).remove();
                    window.console.log("removed");
                }
            }
        }(thisId));
    $("#p"+thisId).animate({ left:"+=32px" }, complete);
}
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Technically the function expression you are calling immediately is not a closure. –  Felix Kling Aug 30 '11 at 21:04
    
Isn't it a closure around id? –  FishBasketGordo Aug 30 '11 at 21:04
    
A closure is a function which is executed in another context. Here you (a) are executing the function in the same context and (b) don't access any variable from th parent context. The function which is passed to animate is a closure, because it gets executed inside animate but has access to variables defined in your immediate function. –  Felix Kling Aug 30 '11 at 21:07
    
So the function returned from the immediately invoked function is a closure, right? –  FishBasketGordo Aug 30 '11 at 21:11
    
Yes, that would be a closure... if you meant this one from the beginning, then you have been right and I apologize :) –  Felix Kling Aug 30 '11 at 21:13
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Just wrapping what you had in an anonymous function should work:

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
    (function() {
        var thisId = dropId+i;
        $("#p"+thisId).animate({ left:"+=32px" }, function(){
            if ($("#p"+thisId).position().left == 1024) {
                $("#p"+thisId).remove();
                window.console.log("removed");
            }
        });

    })();
}
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