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I am using sphinx to generate the documentation for a project of mines.

In such project, I describe a list of available commands in a yaml file which, once loaded, results in a dictionary in the form {command-name : command-description} for example:

commands = {"copy"  : "Copy the highlighted text in the clipboard",
            "paste" : "Paste the clipboard text to cursor location",
            ...}

What I would like to know, is if there is a method in sphinx to load the yaml file during the make html cycle, translate the python dictionary in some reStructuredText format (e.g. a definition list) and include in my html output.

I would expect my .rst file to look like:

Available commands
==================
The commands available in bla-bla-bla...

.. magic-directive-that-execute-python-code::
   :maybe python code or name of python file here:

and to be converted internally to:

Available commands
==================
The commands available in bla-bla-bla...

copy
  Copy the highlighted text in the clipboard

paste
  Paste the clipboard text to cursor location

before being translated to html.

Thank you in advance for your time and expertise!

share|improve this question
    
This is not a proper answer so I put it as a comment. As far as I know, there's no way to parse a yaml file with sphinx directly, but I think you can make it using pyyaml and modifying you sphinx Makefile. –  Oscar Carballal Aug 30 '11 at 23:00
1  
What's the point of writing YAML code? Why not just write the description in the Python module and use Sphinx's autodoc? Why make something that's more complicated than sphinx.pocoo.org/ext/autodoc.html? –  S.Lott Aug 30 '11 at 23:29
    
@S.Lott - The basic idea is DNRY: commands are defined (and can be overridden by the user) in a yml file. The example above is simplified for making the question easier to understand, but the actual yml file contains indeed extra information for the parser like the number of parameters, the possible flags, the validation callback, etc... It simply seems stupid (and a potential source of bugs in the documentation) to repeat the same information in the yml file and the module docstring. –  mac Aug 31 '11 at 6:33
1  
@Oscar - Appreciate you took the time to drop a comment, but pyyaml is not the problem here (obviously I'm using it already in the module that loads the yml file). The problem is that I don't know how I should modify the makefile... would you mind to articulate your suggestion a bit more? Thanks! –  mac Aug 31 '11 at 6:37
1  
@mac: Why waste time writing code in YAML? If you want the users to be able to define (and override) commands, Python is perfectly acceptable. The Python syntax for a dictionary is no more complex than YAML, and you simply avoid this weird multi-language issue. –  S.Lott Aug 31 '11 at 12:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

At the end I find a way to achieve what I wanted. Here's the how-to:

  1. Create a python script (let's call it generate-includes.py) that will generate the reStructuredText and save it in the myrst.inc file. (In my example, this would be the script loading and parsing the YAML, but this is irrelevant). Make sure this file is executable!!!
  2. Use the include directive in your main .rst document of your documentation, in the point where you want your dynamically-generated documentation to be inserted:

    .. include:: myrst.inc
    
  3. Modify the sphinx Makefile in order to generate the required .inc files at build time:

    myrst.inc:
        ./generate-includes.py
    
    html: myrst.inc
        ...(other stuff here)
    
  4. Build your documentation normally with make html.

share|improve this answer

Sphinx doesn't have anything built-in to do what you like. You can either create a custom directive to process your files or generate the reStructuredText in a separate step and include the resulting reStructuredText file using the include directive.

share|improve this answer
    
So good to know that .. magic-directive-that-execute-python-code:: needs to be something I code then. I tried to get a crack at it and although I manage to write a directive that insert my script-generated text I couldn't understand how I can make it parse. For example: nodes.paragraph('', '**text**') will output **text** rather than text. How can I tell sphinx to parse it with standard reStructuredText syntax? –  mac Aug 31 '11 at 9:03
    
In your Directive subclass you'll have handle_content() and handle_signature() methods. You can recursively call self.state.nested_parse() and it will handle the built-in styles properly. Checkout Creating reStructuredText Directives –  devin_s Aug 31 '11 at 16:37
    
Thank you devin_s (+1). As you may have noticed (see my own answer) I finally solved using the .. include:: directive. Will check out your solution too, though, asap! –  mac Aug 31 '11 at 18:15

I needed the same thing, so I threw together a new directive that seems to work (I know nothing about custom Sphinx directives, but it's worked so far):

import sys
from os.path import basename
from StringIO import StringIO

from sphinx.util.compat import Directive
from docutils import nodes

class ExecDirective(Directive):
    """Execute the specified python code and insert the output into the document"""
    has_content = True

    def run(self):
        oldStdout, sys.stdout = sys.stdout, StringIO()
        try:
            exec '\n'.join(self.content)
            return [nodes.paragraph(text = sys.stdout.getvalue())]
        except Exception, e:
            return [nodes.error(None, nodes.paragraph(text = "Unable to execute python code at %s:%d:" % (basename(self.src), self.srcline)), nodes.paragraph(text = str(e)))]
        finally:
            sys.stdout = oldStdout

def setup(app):
    app.add_directive('exec', ExecDirective)

It's used as follows:

.. exec::
   print "Python code!"
   print "This text will show up in the document"
share|improve this answer

An improvement based on Michael's code and the built-in include directive:

import sys
from os.path import basename

try:
    from StringIO import StringIO
except ImportError:
    from io import StringIO

from sphinx.util.compat import Directive
from docutils import nodes, statemachine

class ExecDirective(Directive):
    """Execute the specified python code and insert the output into the document"""
    has_content = True

    def run(self):
        oldStdout, sys.stdout = sys.stdout, StringIO()

        tab_width = self.options.get('tab-width', self.state.document.settings.tab_width)
        source = self.state_machine.input_lines.source(self.lineno - self.state_machine.input_offset - 1)

        try:
            exec('\n'.join(self.content))
            text = sys.stdout.getvalue()
            lines = statemachine.string2lines(text, tab_width, convert_whitespace=True)
            self.state_machine.insert_input(lines, source)
            return []
        except Exception:
            return [nodes.error(None, nodes.paragraph(text = "Unable to execute python code at %s:%d:" % (basename(source), self.lineno)), nodes.paragraph(text = str(sys.exc_info()[1])))]
        finally:
            sys.stdout = oldStdout

def setup(app):
    app.add_directive('exec', ExecDirective)

This one imports the output earlier so that it goes straight through the parser. It also works in Python 3.

share|improve this answer

Sphinx does support custom extensions that would probably be the best way to do this http://sphinx.pocoo.org/ext/tutorial.html.

share|improve this answer
    
When I originally posted the question, I looked at it, but it does look like an overly complex solution for just doing what I needed... Why would you think it would be "the best way"? –  mac Oct 8 '11 at 11:56

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