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I have a NodeJS readstream listener within a function and I am trying to get my function to return a value (contents of the file) which is derived from within the listener.

e.g. :

MyObj.prototype.read = function(){  

    var file3 = fs.createReadStream('test.txt', {encoding: 'utf8'});            
    var contentRead = '';       

    file3.addListener('data', function(data) {   
      contentRead += data.toString('utf-8');    
      return contentRead;            
    });
}

I would like to do something like var contents = myDerivedObj.read() to return the contents of the file.

However, the return from inside the listener is not getting returned correctly - getting 'undefined'. And, returning from outside the listener just returns an empty string.

I cannot change the signature of read(), so I cannot add a callback as an argument.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general, this is a poor pattern: NodeJS REALLY REALLY REALLY doesn't like it when you do things like this 'cause you block the main thread. You will discover that your performance TRULY sucks. So DON'T DO THIS. But if you MUST then you can try this:

MyObj.prototype.read = function(){  

    var file3 = fs.createReadStream('test.txt', {encoding: 'utf8'});            
    var contentRead = '';       
    var done = false;

    file3.addListener('data', function(data) {   
      contentRead += data.toString('utf-8');    
    });

    file3.addListener("end", function () {
       done = true;
     });

    while(!done);
    return contentRead;
}

EDIT: @Brandon is right, and I'm wrong. I just tested this and although I'd thought the callbacks would work the entire node process locks up. Do this:

MyObj.prototype.read = function(){      
        return fs.readFileSync('test.txt', 'utf-8');
    }
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1  
so, w/o using callbacks and modifying the method signature, what would be the preferred pattern for such a case ? –  Bamerza Aug 31 '11 at 1:12
2  
+1. The whole point of Node is asynchronous I/O, and writing blocking code like this is completely antithetical to its philosophy. Node has a few filesystem methods that read data synchronously (for example, readFileSync), mainly used for reading small configuration files during program start-up where asynchronous I/O is not required. Otherwise, you should really try to embrace Node's asynchronous model (or use another, better-fitting technology). –  Brandon Tilley Aug 31 '11 at 1:15
2  
@Bamerza Femi may have other thoughts, but in Node, all your own code (the code you personally write) executes in a single thread. Thus, without callbacks, you can't handle I/O and other asynchronous calls, and your Node.js application will completely lock up until the entire file is read from disk if you use a blocking call. That said, if you absolutely must then the code Femi provided would work; also, as I mentioned, Node provides synchronous versions of its filesystem methods, so you can just read the file and return it. –  Brandon Tilley Aug 31 '11 at 2:03
    
@Brandon: create an answer and I'll delete mine. –  Femi Aug 31 '11 at 2:35
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