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I need to create a constructor that creates an account. It will ask the user to input an id number (4 digits) and it will create an account with $0 in it. Later the user will be able to add and subtract money, which I can do myself. I am just very confused about how to build a constructor. Here is my code:

import java.util.*;
public class Account{
public static void main(String[] args){
    int id = 0;
    double balance = 0;
    Account account = new Account();
}
public Account(){
}
}

Is public Account() the constructor? or is it just an object? And if it IS the constructor, what exactly do I need to do create the account? (make the methods in the constructor or in another class?)

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You'll want to put the int id=0; and double balance=0; lines into the actual constructor (instead of the main() method). –  bdares Aug 31 '11 at 1:55
    
Yea they are going to be in another class where I will be calling this class from. Sorry for the wrongs –  Josh Aug 31 '11 at 2:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes public Account(), is the constructor, constructors do not have a return type and they must be named exactly the same as the class.

The constructor must be in the same class.

You do not need to do anything in your constructor, unless you want to initialize some of the attributes for your Account class. The no-arg constructor instantiates an object, because the compiler will insert a call to super() in the first line of the constructor. Super will call the constructor up in the hierarchy tree all the way to Object.

In fact you do not even have to write that no-arg constructor, unless you have another constructor in your Account class that takes one or more arguments, since the compiler will supply a no-arg constructor if there isn't any explicit constructor.

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ok thanks man. What is the point of creating a constructor? Do you have to have one if you have another class in another window that you call to compute things? –  Josh Aug 31 '11 at 1:56
    
@Josh You need the constructor to instantiate an object, this is required before you can do anything with that object. If you don't provide one, the compiler will provide a no-arg constructor by default. –  Oscar Gomez Aug 31 '11 at 1:59
    
Oh ok. Thanks man! Now it is just a matter of creating all my methods to do all these tasks. And then calling them. You have answered my question perfectly! Thanks again! –  Josh Aug 31 '11 at 2:03

For the record, your code should look like this. Your class attributes are declared outside of methods, and the work to initialize them is in the constructor (Account()) .

import java.util.*;
public class Account{
    int id;
    double balance;
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Account account = new Account();
    }
    public Account(){
        id = 0;
        balance = 0;
    }
}
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