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I'm learning java and have a bit of code I am trying to write that should round 24.9999999 to 25. Instead, it goes to 8.

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
public class RadiusOfCircle
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner kbInput = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("What is the area? _");
        double area = kbInput.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Radius of your circle is " + Math.sqrt( area / Math.PI));

        double radius = Math.sqrt( area / Math.PI);
        System.out.println("\nChecking your work now...\n   area = pi*(r^2)\n   " + area + " = 3.14 * (" + radius + ")^2");
        double radiusSqrd = Math.pow(radius, 2);
        System.out.println("   " + area + " = 3.14 * " + radiusSqrd);
        System.out.println("   " + area + " = " + Math.PI * radiusSqrd);
        System.out.println(area + " = " + (Math.round(radiusSqrd)));
        System.out.println("Are the two values the same? \nIf yes, your code is correct! \nIf no, try again!");
    }
}

Also, when it asks for keyboard input of what the area is, I put in 25.

This is the output:

What is the area? _25
Radius of your circle is 2.8209479177387813

Checking your work now...
   area = pi*(r^2)
   25.0 = 3.14 * (2.8209479177387813)^2
   25.0 = 3.14 * 7.957747154594766
   25.0 = 24.999999999999996
25.0 = 8
Are the two values the same? 
If yes, your code is correct! 
If no, try again!
share|improve this question
    
I hope 24.anything never "properly" rounds to 8 :-) –  user166390 Aug 31 '11 at 4:36
3  
This would have been a good time to use the debugger to debug your code so you can see what each line is doing. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 31 '11 at 6:14
    
I found Peter's comment most helpful for a student. I would have directed the student's attention to this line of output: " 25.0 = 24.999999999999996" –  Jeff Grigg Sep 1 '11 at 1:41
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
System.out.println("   " + area + " = " + Math.PI * radiusSqrd);
System.out.println(area + " = " + (Math.round(radiusSqrd)));

Shouldn't that be:

double value = Math.PI * radiusSqrd;
System.out.println("   " + area + " = " +value );
System.out.println(area + " = " + (Math.round(value )));
share|improve this answer
    
yes, i didn't realize that i was rounding the wrong value. i changed it so that last part is math.round(Math.PI * radiusSqrd) –  Alex G Aug 31 '11 at 4:21
    
Since I was first I should get the green tick :P –  Zammbi Aug 31 '11 at 4:25
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You're rounding radiusSquared only, rather than Math.PI * radiusSquared. Fixing that should get the result you expect.

share|improve this answer
1  
oh right. thanks! problem solved –  Alex G Aug 31 '11 at 4:20
1  
Good catch. 7.957747154594766 is rounding correctly to 8. –  Jonathan B Aug 31 '11 at 4:21
3  
+1. Also you should accept the answer as correct :) Welcome to stack overflow! –  ajacian81 Aug 31 '11 at 4:22
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You omitted to multiply by PI:

System.out.println(area + " = " + Math.round(Math.PI * radiusSqrd));

Executing this gives the expected result.

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float and double were designed for engineering problems, which have large positive powers of 10.. they cannot express negative powers of 10 accurately. In such cases use BigDecimal.

Run this simple code from Joshua Bloch's book Effective Java to get a sense of the extend of inaccuracy when dealing with negative powers and using double to store them. The answer should acutally be zero, but turns out to be something else entirely!

double funds = 1.00; 
int itemsBought = 0; 
for (double price = .10; funds >= price; price += .10) { 
  funds -= price; 
  itemsBought++; 
} 
System.out.println(itemsBought + ” items bought.”); 
System.out.println(“Change: $” + funds); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Buy the book Effective Java 2 and put it under your pillow after you've finished learning the basics –  Varun Achar Aug 31 '11 at 4:25
    
FYI IEEE-754 also specifies Base-10 implementations (the float and double found in Java and most processors/languages are Base-2 though). The first sentence of this reply is ... confusing. –  user166390 Aug 31 '11 at 4:32
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If you want "accurate" math in Java, you should use the BigDecimal class, rather than either of the built-in floating point primitive types. double and float are always going to have issues like this, due to the nature of floating point arithmetic.

Please note that the recommended constructor for BigDecimal uses a String, not any of the numeric types. Since you are getting input from the console, this should be easy to implement.

share|improve this answer
    
haven't learned that yet, but thanks for the tip. i was wondering why it would just stop the decimal places after a little bit. –  Alex G Aug 31 '11 at 4:20
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You can use something like this:

    double d = 10.938;

    BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(d);
    bd = bd.setScale(0,BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
    System.out.println(bd);

    bd = new BigDecimal(d);
    bd = bd.setScale(1,BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);        
    System.out.println(bd);

    bd = new BigDecimal(d);        
    bd = bd.setScale(2,BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
    System.out.println(bd);

or like this:

    double d = 10.938;

    DecimalFormat decimalFormat = new DecimalFormat("#");        
    System.out.println(decimalFormat.format(d));

    decimalFormat = new DecimalFormat("#.#");
    System.out.println(decimalFormat.format(d));

    decimalFormat = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
    System.out.println(decimalFormat.format(d));
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