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So this works..

public MyClass(ref Apple apple)
{
    apple = new Apple("Macintosh"); // Works fine
}

But is it possible to do something like this?

private Apple myApple;

public MyClass(ref Apple apple)
{
    myApple = apple;
}

public void ModifyApple()
{
    myApple = new Apple("Macintosh"); // does not change the input variable like the first example did
}

When the ref variable is copied to the member variable myApple it appears to lose it's 'ref-ness' and re-assigning it no longer changes the input variable. Is there a way around this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not really, no. By the time your code is next invoked, the original variable used as the method argument may no longer even exist:

void Foo()
{
    MyClass x = Bar();
    x.ModifyApple();
}

MyClass Bar()
{
    Apple apple = new Apple();
    return new MyClass(ref apple);
}

Here, apple is a local variable, in a stack frame which will have been popped by the time we call ModifyApple.

Are you sure you need to modify the original caller's variable rather than just changing the object itself?

One way to sort of fake this would be to use a wrapper type to start with:

public class MutableWrapper<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

Then pass in a MutableWrapper<Apple>, and store that in your class. Then in ModifyApple you can write:

wrapper.Value = new Apple();

This won't change the caller's variable, but next time the caller looks at the Value property, they'll see your new apple.

To be honest, this sort of thing tends to make for hard-to-maintain code, and even ref isn't great for readability. If you can explain the bigger picture of what you're trying to achieve, we may be able to suggest a better overall approach.

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Well, here is what I am trying to get work: pastebin.com/v4pNa1um The reason why I cannot pass activeLayer as ref to Undo and Redo is because I don't know what it is at that point. Any ideas? –  Joey Williams Aug 31 '11 at 6:42
    
@Joey: That doesn't really show the big picture at all - it only shows trying to update some variables. Perhaps you want a stack of undo layers, for example? –  Jon Skeet Aug 31 '11 at 6:43
    
I already have an undo and redo stack in my program. Basically, any undo-able or redo-able action in my program manipulates a tile layer. Before a change is made to the tile layer a new edit is pushed on to the stack and the tile layer is saved before any changes are made. Then if the user ever uses undo or redo it should revert the layer to its saved undo or redo state. –  Joey Williams Aug 31 '11 at 6:48
    
@Joey: I'm afraid that doesn't help me understand why you feel you need the "ref"-ness here. However, either way it's not available I'm afraid... –  Jon Skeet Aug 31 '11 at 7:24
    
Is there any reason to make Value a property rather than a field? A field can be used with things like Interlocked methods, whereas a property cannot. –  supercat Jan 15 '12 at 19:00

ref-ness is a property of parameters of functions and arguments you are passing to functions. It's not a property of variables (or even fields) in general.

So indeed, what you are trying there is doomed from the start.

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No, there isn't. myApple is a field that holds a reference to an Apple; the parameter apple, however, is actually a reference-to-a-reference-to-an-Apple. When you assign apple to myApple you dereference the value of the parameter. Beyond that, they are separate and distinct.

So no: it is not possible.

What would be possible is to have something like:

public class AppleWrapper {
    public Apple Value {get;set;}
}

Now; if you store an AppleWrapper, any number of callers can access and change the .Value

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Why not just have ModifyApple return the modified Apple instance?

public Apple ModifyApple()
{
    myApple = new Apple("Macintosh"); // does not change the input variable like the first example did
    return myApple;
}
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