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I have the sorted vector

m<-c(1.1, 3.2, 3.6, 4, 4.6, 4.6, 5.6, 5.7, 6.2, 8.9)

I want to find the position of a value based on approximate matching. If the value does not exist in the vector i would like the position of the immediately previous value

for exact matching I would use

> match(4,m)
[1] 4

But if I do

> match(6,m)
[1] NA

What i would like to get in this example is 8 (the position of the immidiately previous value of 6 which is the position of 5.7 which is 8)

Thank you in advance

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1  
Do you want to find the index for a single value or for several values? If you need several values, see my answer below regarding using findInterval. –  Tommy Aug 31 '11 at 16:19
1  
I agree, @Tommy's answer to use findInterval is best. –  Andrie Aug 31 '11 at 16:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use which.max in combination with vector subsetting, a solution of 17 characters:

which.max(m[m<=6]) # Edited to specify <=
[1] 8

Since your vector is sorted, you can use the even shorter:

sum(m<=6) # Edited to specify <=
[1] 8

This works because the value TRUE is implicitly converted to 1 in the sum

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Worked like a charm. Fast as a speeding bullet!!! Thankx –  ECII Aug 31 '11 at 9:16
1  
@ECII I just noticed a small error. I think the correct operator is <= instead of < - otherwise it will not find exact matches. Please check your own results. –  Andrie Aug 31 '11 at 9:18
    
Don't worry, have already changed it. Thank you again –  ECII Aug 31 '11 at 9:47
1  
damn... I had considered sum() but thought it might be obtuse for the questioner... clarifying why was a good idea. :) BTW, max(which()) is, surprisingly to some, faster than which.max(y[]) because of the speed of []... it's almost as fast as the sum() solution –  John Aug 31 '11 at 10:29
1  
...but if you want to find several values then findInterval wins... –  Tommy Aug 31 '11 at 16:25

Something like:

> m<-c(1.1, 3.2, 3.6, 4, 4.6, 4.6, 5.6, 5.7, 6.2, 8.9)

> ( index = length(m[m<=4]) )
[1] 4

> ( m[index] )
[1] 4

> ( index = length(m[m<=6]) )
[1] 8

> ( m[index] )
[1] 5.7
share|improve this answer
    
m[index] is an element of m, which isn't what the OP wants. –  Jack Maney Aug 31 '11 at 7:54
    
Although you do bring up an important point that a vector-based solution is better in R than a loop. Lemme edit my answer... –  Jack Maney Aug 31 '11 at 7:57
    
@Jack Maney I added some output to make it more clear. I think that's what the OP wanted, but will withdraw the answer if it's still incorrect (it's early and I have a hangover from hell) :D –  Tony Breyal Aug 31 '11 at 8:02

you could use the which() function to get the index of the element with the smallest deviation from your searched value. Also works with unordered vectors.

x <- c(8,4,1,2,3,6,9)
find <- 6
pos <- which(abs(x-find) == min(abs(x-find)))
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This should do it for you.

#v is a sorted vector and x is an item for which we want the exact or nearest lower match
lowSideMatch <- function(x, v) max(which(v <= x))

lowSideMatch(6, m)
[1] 8

lowSideMatch(4, m)
[1] 4
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There is a built-in function that does precisely what you want: findInterval ...It's vectorized as well, so you can give it several values to find in one go which is much more efficient.

m <- c(1.1, 3.2, 3.6, 4, 4.6, 4.6, 5.6, 5.7, 6.2, 8.9)
# Find nearest (lower) index for both 4 and 6
findInterval(c(4,6), m) 
# [1] 4 8
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1  
+1 Brilliant. I knew this had to exist, but have never been able to find it. Thank you. –  Andrie Aug 31 '11 at 16:31
    
@Andrie - Yeah, the naming of R functions isn't always obvious! –  Tommy Aug 31 '11 at 16:52

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