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I've just started using Eclipse 3.7. Previously with Eclipse 3.6 I used a tool called TPTP for execution-time profiling (It could do a lot else besides this, but that's all I needed it for).

I note that TPTP has now been sidelined, it's no longer an active Eclipse project.

Is there a new project which replaces TPTP? There does not seem to be an equivalent tool bundled with Eclipse, so I'm wondering which is the default go-to free profiler for Eclipse 3.7?

Extra points: The class I'm profiling makes use of a lot of JNI calls. I'm not expecting to get any meaningful insight about what happens in these native calls, but I do not want the fact that I use native calls to break the profiller. For some reason TPTP on Eclipse 3.6 couldnt handle this at all!

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4 Answers

i m working with this tool:

http://code.google.com/a/eclipselabs.org/p/jvmmonitor/

Bye

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I tried to install the latest version of this with no real luck. In both eclipse 3.6 & 3.7 I get the following crash: –  Salim Fadhley Aug 31 '11 at 11:53
    
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@Salim, try to refresh the repository of jvm monitor in the available repositories preference page. –  Kane Aug 31 '11 at 13:22
    
No luck installing 3.7.1.20110817 - it crashes every time –  Salim Fadhley Sep 21 '11 at 14:10
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If a commercial solution is an option for you, I can recommend

http://www.yourkit.com/

or

http://www.ej-technologies.com

Although the latter made my VM crash on OSX, when I last tried. Fortunately, there's a fully working trial version...

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You can try VisualVM (is not an Eclipse tool, is included into the JDK 6 Update 7 and next)

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You can use JVM Monitor, which is a free Eclipse plugin in pure Java.

https://code.google.com/a/eclipselabs.org/p/jvmmonitor/

It lets you monitor JVM applications, doesn't require any special launch configuration or preparation, and uses standard JVM APIs to connect and monitor. For me it just worked moderately OK, right out-of-the-box.

It includes profiling, targets your specified packages & includes 'total time' and call trees for method profiling. These were what I needed & couldn't get with JVisualVM.

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