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    public static class Tracking
    {

        public static List<TrackList<T>> Lists = new List<TrackList<T>>();

        public static List<TrackedDictionary<K,V>> Dictionaries =new List<TrackedDictionary<K,V>>()

        public static void Register<K,V>(TrackedDictionary<K,V> dictionary)
        {
            Dictionaries.Add(dictionary);
        }

        public static void Register<T> (TrackList<T> list)
        {
            Lists.Add(list);
        }
    }

public class TrackList<T> : List<T>
    {
        private string ListName = null;
        private int AvgSize;

        public TrackList ()
        { }

        public TrackList (string listname, int avgsize)
        {
            this.ListName = listname;
            this.AvgSize = avgsize;
            Tracking.Register(this);
        }

        public int GetListSize ()
        {
            return this.Count * this.AvgSize;
        }
    }

public class TrackedDictionary<K, V> : Dictionary<K, V>
    {
        public string DictionaryName = null;
        public byte AvgSize;

        public TrackedDictionary ()
        { }

        public TrackedDictionary (string dictionaryname, byte avgsize)
        {
            this.DictionaryName = dictionaryname;
            this.AvgSize = avgsize;
            Tracking.Register(this);
        }

        public int GetDictionarySize ()
        {
            return this.Count * this.AvgSize;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Please, provide some more context: what is the problem you're trying to solve by the approach you want to use? –  loki2302 Aug 31 '11 at 9:56
    
Consider reading about generics in C#: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/512aeb7t(v=VS.100).aspx –  Steven Jeuris Aug 31 '11 at 9:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You haven't declared Tracking as a generic type, so T, K and V have no meaning. You can do so easily enough:

public static class Tracking<T, K, V>
{
    ...
}

Note that you'll now have separate Lists, Dictionaries etc fields per concrete type. You'll need to make the methods non-generic though.

An alternative is to have a top-level non-generic class, with generic methods and generic nested types:

public static class Tracking
{
    private static class ListHelper<T>
    {
        internal static List<TrackList<T>> Lists = new List<TrackList<T>>();
    }

    private static class DictionaryHelper<K, V>
    {
        internal static List<TrackedDictionary<K,V>> Dictionaries =
            new List<TrackedDictionary<K,V>>()
    }

    public static void Register<K,V>(TrackedDictionary<K,V> dictionary)
    {
        DictionaryHelper<K, V>.Dictionaries.Add(dictionary);
    }

    public static void Register<T> (TrackList<T> list)
    {
        ListHelper<T>.Lists.Add(list);
    }
}

I'd also strongly advise against public fields like this... and against using statics widely to start with, given the problems they cause for testability.

share|improve this answer
    
I want it generic , I can't make a static class generic –  Amit Pore Aug 31 '11 at 9:56
    
Class wont be generic any more –  Amit Pore Aug 31 '11 at 9:56
1  
@Amit: Yes you can. static class Foo<T> {} compiles with no problem. Please post the error message you're getting - perhaps you're trying to put an extension method in a generic type? –  Jon Skeet Aug 31 '11 at 9:57
    
Have a look here for an exmaple of a generic static class weblogs.asp.net/whaggard/archive/2004/09/05/225955.aspx –  kmcc049 Aug 31 '11 at 9:58

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