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I am using jQuery and I have an aAax request as follows;

    $.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        url: 'test.php',
        data: {
            data: "test_data"
        },
        cache: false,
        success: function(result) {
            if (result == "true"){
                alert("true");
            }else{
                alert("false");
            }
        },
    });

This works well. But, I want to do this in a timely manner, in specific intervals of time. Say, I want to execute this every 30 seconds. The page should not be reloaded. I want this to happen in background, hidden. Anybody know how to do this?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted
setInterval(function() {
    $.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        url: 'test.php',
        data: {
            data: "test_data"
        },
        cache: false,
        success: function(result) {
            if (result == "true"){
                alert("true");
            }else{
                alert("false");
            }
        }
    });
}, 30000);
share|improve this answer
    
this is not exactly i am looking for. I want my script in a loop, to init every 30 seconds,no matter the result, just like alert "hi" for every 30 seconds. – blasteralfred Ψ Aug 31 '11 at 10:58
    
Fixed! If you want to stop the timed requests, just store the setInterval return and destroy it later. – Carlos Guimaraes Aug 31 '11 at 11:04
    
Here's a fiddle to you better understand jsfiddle.net/FatUe/1 – Carlos Guimaraes Aug 31 '11 at 11:09

Using setInterval? http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/met_win_setinterval.asp

Or if you only wanted it to run after a success message you could use setTimeout in the success callback to recall the function that sends that ajax request

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Just don't refer to w3schools, there are a lot of mistakes there. – J0HN Aug 31 '11 at 10:19
    
I know, but I don't think that applies in this case and has a very basic, but useful write up :-) – Alex Aug 31 '11 at 10:21

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