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Validation using attributes in asp.net mvc is really nice. I have been using the [Range(min, max)] validator this far for checking values, like e.g.:

[Range(1, 10)]
public int SomeNumber { get; set; }

However - now I need to check the min and max condition separately. I expected to find attributes like these:

[MinValue(1, "Value must be at least 1")]
[MaxValue(10, "Value can't be more than 10")]
public int SomeNumber { get; set; }

Are there any predefined attributes for writing this? Or how do I achieve this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Here is how I would write a validator for MaxValue

public class MaxValueAttribute : ValidationAttribute
    {
        private readonly int _maxValue;

        public MaxValueAttribute(int maxValue)
        {
            _maxValue = maxValue;
        }

        public override bool IsValid(object value)
        {
            return (int) value <= _maxValue;
        }
    }

The MinValue Attribute should be fairly the same

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Ok, was expecting that they exist, but fair enough to write them. Thx! –  stiank81 Aug 31 '11 at 12:40
1  
Just FYI this would not magically validate the form on the Javascript end. You would need to write additional code + js for that. –  basarat Mar 15 '13 at 1:30
1  
@basarat actually you won't need extra JS, the jquery validation library already has functions for min/max, you just need to implement the IClientValidation interface on the above attribute and return the correct values from the GetClientValidationRules method –  WickyNilliams Sep 6 '13 at 13:56

I don't think min/max validations attribute exist. I would use something like

[Range(1, Int32.MaxValue)]

for minimum value 1 and

[Range(Int32.MinValue, 10)]

for maximum value 10

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2  
Mmm.. Not quite comfortable with this. Looks a bit hacky to me. –  stiank81 Aug 31 '11 at 12:41
5  
It is a bit hacky.. but sometimes hacks make me feel more comfortable :) –  Guy Aug 31 '11 at 16:03
    
Went with this, but had problems once we were dealing with huge floating point values. –  Jonn Nov 19 '12 at 1:45
    
@Jonn: I know it is late but might be usefull to someone else too in the future. There is also Int64.MaxValue; // = 9223372036854775807L, UInt64.MaxValue; // = 18446744073709551615UL, double.MaxValue; // = 1.79769313486232E+308, Single.MaxValue; // Same as float.MaxValue = 3.402823E+38f. there should be an option for any job I would assume. Note decimal.MaxValue won't work as it is not a constant. –  François Wahl Dec 18 '12 at 19:05
1  
and it works on the client browser as well for free :) –  basarat Mar 15 '13 at 1:31

A complete example of how this could be done. To avoid having to write client-side validation scripts, the existing ValidationType = "range" has been used.

public class MinValueAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
    private readonly double _minValue;

    public MinValueAttribute(double minValue)
    {
        _minValue = minValue;
        ErrorMessage = "Enter a value greater or equal than " + _minValue;  
    }

    public MinValueAttribute(int minValue)
    {
        _minValue = minValue;
        ErrorMessage = "Enter a value greater or equal than " + _minValue;
    }

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        return Convert.ToDouble(value) >= _minValue;
    }

    public IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context)
    {
        var rule = new ModelClientValidationRule();
        rule.ErrorMessage = ErrorMessage;
        rule.ValidationParameters.Add("min", _minValue);
        rule.ValidationParameters.Add("max", Double.MaxValue);
        rule.ValidationType = "range";
        yield return rule;
    }

}
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3  
Great answer. I would modify the error message a bit: "Enter a value greater than or equal to " is a more (grammatically-speaking) correct error message. –  Tieson T. Jul 26 '12 at 0:04

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