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This is a part of my shell script, which I use to perform a recursive find and replace in the working directory. Backup and other utilities are in other functions, which are irrelevant to my problem.

#!/bin/bash

# backup function goes here

# @param $1 The find pattern.
# @param $2 The replace pattern. 
function findAndReplace {
    bufferFile=/tmp/tmp.$$
    filesToReplace=`find . -type f | grep -vi cvs | grep -v '#'`
    sedPattern="s/$1/$2/g"
    echo "Using pattern $sedPattern"
    for f in $filesToReplace; do
        echo "sedding file $f"
        sed "$sedPattern" "$f" > "$bufferFile"
        exitCode=$?
        if [ $exitCode -ne 0 ] ; then
            echo "sed $sedPattern exited with $exitCode"
            exit 1
        fi
        chown --reference=$f $bufferFile
        mv $bufferFile $f
    done
}

backup
findAndReplace "$1" "$2"

Here's a sample usage: recursive-replace.sh "function _report" "function report".

It works, but there is one problem. It uses sed on ALL files in the working directory. I would like to sed only those files, which contain the find pattern.

Then, I modified the line:

filesToReplace=`find . -type f | grep -vi cvs | grep -v '#'`

to:

filesToReplace=`grep -rl "$1" . | grep -vi cvs | grep -v '#'`

And it works too, but not for all find patterns. E.g. for pattern \$this->report\((.*)\) I recieve error: grep: Unmatched ( or \(. This pattern is correct for sed, but not for grep. Regex syntaxes for grep and sed differ. What can I do?

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2 Answers 2

use grep -E ("extended" regexp option) — it usually solves the problem.

(also sometimes available as egrep)

Also, why not keep using find?

filesToReplace=`find . -name CVS -prune -o -type f -exec grep -l "$1" {} \; | grep -v '#'`

Also note the -i option of sed, which allows in-place changes in files and the removal of the bufferFile/chown/mv logic.

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I don't get the error message, but the files containing $this->report('foo') are not found and therefore replaced. I also tried replacing the (.*) with ([^)]*), but no to avail. –  Dagguh Aug 31 '11 at 12:56
    
I'm not sure I understand that $this… problem. Maybe the dollar gets interpreted somewhere by bash? –  cadrian Aug 31 '11 at 13:12
1  
Thanks for the -i flag, it reduced some of my code :) –  Dagguh Aug 31 '11 at 13:26
1  
@Jack: I filter out CVS artifacts, because I need to see the list of files that were changed and I am interested only in those, which will be in the repository. If not the filtering, I would recieve garbage output, which then I would have to filter. –  Dagguh Aug 31 '11 at 13:42
1  
@cadrian: I double encoded the dollar and it worked found the files I needed. Thanks! recursive-replace "\\\$this->report(\(.*\))" "\\\$this->report(\\1, 'bar')" –  Dagguh Aug 31 '11 at 13:45

Why not compare source and buffer files before overwriting the source file:

    #!/bin/bash
    # backup function goes here

    # @param $1 The find pattern.
    # @param $2 The replace pattern. 
    function findAndReplace {
        bufferFile=/tmp/tmp.$$
        filesToReplace=`find . -type f | grep -vi cvs | grep -v '#'`
        sedPattern="s/$1/$2/g"
        echo "Using pattern $sedPattern"
        for f in $filesToReplace; do
            echo "sedding file $f"
            sed "$sedPattern" "$f" > "$bufferFile"
            exitCode=$?         
            if [ $exitCode -ne 0 ] ; then
                echo "sed $sedPattern exited with $exitCode"
                exit 1
            fi
            cmp -s $f $bufferFile
            if [ $? -ne 0 ]; then
                chown --reference=$f $bufferFile
                mv $bufferFile $f
            fi
        done
    }

backup
findAndReplace "$1" "$2"
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, this is not the issue. –  Dagguh Aug 31 '11 at 13:51

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