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Imagine I have defined the following Enum:

public enum Status : byte
{
    Inactive = 1,
    Active = 2,
}

What's the best practice to use enum? Should it start with 1 like the above example or start with 0 (without the explicit values) like this:

public enum Status : byte
{
    Inactive,
    Active
}
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9  
Do you really need to number them explicitly at all? –  Yuck Aug 31 '11 at 13:16
139  
Enums were created just so that things like this wouldn't be important. –  BoltClock Aug 31 '11 at 13:17
3  
why not use a boolean? –  Daniel A. White Aug 31 '11 at 13:18
6  
@Daniel -- arrgh no! Better to use an enum when you think a boolean will do than to use a boolean when you are thinking of an enum. –  AAT Aug 31 '11 at 14:09
19  
@Daniel because of the FileNotFound value, of course –  Joubarc Aug 31 '11 at 14:13

13 Answers 13

up vote 119 down vote accepted

Framework Design Guidelines:

  • Do provide a value of zero on your non-flags enum If None is not appropriate for the enum, then assign the zero-value to the element which should be used as the default value for the enum.

  • Avoid using flag enum values normal members that are negative or zero. .. An enum value of zero creates problems with and operations, etc

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12  
Fail early: If 'None' is not appropriate but there's no logical default value, I'd still put a value of zero (and call it 'None' or 'Invalid') that isn't meant to be used, just so that if a class member of that enumeration is not initialized properly, the uninitialized value can easily be spotted, and in switch statements it will jump to the default section, where I throw a InvalidEnumArgumentException. Otherwise a program may unintentionally continue running with the zero value of an enumeration, which may be valid and go unnoticed. –  Allon Guralnek Sep 6 '11 at 18:47
    
@Allon It seems better to only give the enum values you know are valid and then to check for invalid values in the setter and/or constructor. That way you know immediately if some code isn't working correctly rather than allowing an object with invalid data to exist for some unknown time and finding out about it later. Unless 'None' represents a valid state, you shouldn't use it. –  wprl Sep 7 '11 at 14:18
    
@SoloBold: That sounds like a case where you don't forget to initialize an enum class member in a constructor. No amount of validation will help you if you forget to initialize or forget to validate. Also, there are simple DTO classes that don't have any constructors, but rely on object initializers instead. Hunting down such a bug can be extremely painful. Nevertheless, adding an unused enumeration value makes for an ugly API. I would avoid it for APIs geared for public consumption. –  Allon Guralnek Sep 7 '11 at 18:32
    
@Allon That's a good point, but I would argue that you should be validating enums in the setter function and throwing from the getter if the setter was never called. That way you have one point of failure and you can plan on the field always having a valid value, which simplifies the design and code. My two cents anyway. –  wprl Sep 7 '11 at 18:56
    
@SoloBold: Imagine a DTO class with 15 auto-implemented properties. Its body is 15 lines long. Now imagine that same class with regular properties. That's a minimum of 180 lines before adding any verification logic. This class is used exclusively internally for data-transfer purposes only. Which one would you rather maintain, a 15 line class or a 180+ lines class? Succinctness has its value. But still, both our styles are correct, they're simply different. (I guess this is where AOP sweeps in and wins both sides of the argument). –  Allon Guralnek Sep 7 '11 at 19:11

Well, I guess I stand in disagreement with most answers that say not to explicitly number them. I always explicitly number them, but that is because in most cases I end up persisting them in a data stream where they are stored as an integer value. If you don't explicitly add the values and then add a new value you can break the serialization and then not be able to accurately load old persisted objects. If you are going to do any type of persistent store of these values then I would highly recommend explicitly setting the values.

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7  
+1, agreed, but only in the case where your code relies on the integer for some external reason (eg. serialisation). Everywhere else you should stick with just letting the framework do it's job. If you rely on the integer values internally, then you are probably doing something wrong (see: let the framework do it's job). –  Matthew Scharley Aug 31 '11 at 13:43
3  
I like to persist the text of the enum. Makes the database far more usable imo. –  Dave Aug 31 '11 at 14:46
2  
Normally, you don't need explicitly set the values... even when they get serialized. just do ALWAYS add new values at the end. this will solve serialization problems. otherwise you might need a versioning of your data store (e.g. a file header containing a version for changing the behaviour when reading/writing values) (or see memento pattern) –  Beachwalker Aug 31 '11 at 15:59
2  
@Dave: Unless you expliclty document that enum texts are sacred, you set yourself up for failure if a future programmer decides to adjust a name to be clearer or conform to some naming convention. –  supercat Aug 31 '11 at 16:35
1  
@pstrjds: it's a stylistic trade off I guess - disk space is cheap though, time spent constantly converting between enum values and an intwhen searching the db is relatively expensive (doubly so if you have a reporting tool setup against a database or something similar). If you're worried abotu space, with the newer SQL server versions you can have a database compressed, which means 1000 occurences of "SomeEnumTextualValue" will use barely any more space. Of course this won't work for all projects - it's a trade off. I think the worry about bandwidth smells like premature optimisation, maybe! –  Dave Sep 1 '11 at 7:55

An Enum is a value type and its default value (for example for an Enum field in a class) will be 0 if not initialized explicitly.

Therefore you generally want to have 0 as an defined constant (e.g. Unknown).

In your example, if you want Inactive to be the default, then it should have the value zero. Otherwise you might want to consider adding a constant Unknown.

Some people have recommended that you don't explicitly specify values for your constants. Probably good advice in most cases, but there are some cases when you will want to do so:

  • Flags enums

  • Enums whose values are used in interop with external systems (e.g. COM).

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Unless you have a specific reason to change it, leave enums with their default values, which begin at zero.

public enum Status : byte
{
    Inactive,
    Active
}
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I'd say best practice is to not number them and let it be implicit - which would start from 0. Since its implicit its the language preference which is always good to follow :)

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I would start a boolean type enum with a 0.

Unless "Inative" means something other than "Inactive" :)

This retains the standard for those.

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I would say, it depends on how you use them. For flagging enum it is a good practice to have 0 for None value, like that:

[Flags]
enum MyEnum
{
    None = 0,
    Option1 = 1,
    Option2 = 2,
    Option3 = 4,
    All = Option1 | Option2 | Option3,
}

When your enum is likely to be mapped to a database lookup table, I'd start it with 1. It should not matter much for professionally written code, but this improves readability.

In other cases I'd leave it as it is, giving no care whether they start with 0 or 1.

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Don't assign any numbers. Just use it like it supposed to be used.

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If you start at 1, then you can easily get a count of your things.

{
    BOX_THING1     = 1,
    BOX_THING2     = 2,
    BOX_NUM_THING  = BOX_THING2
};

If you start at 0, then use the first one as a value for uninitialized things.

{
    BOX_NO_THING   = 0,
    BOX_THING1     = 1,
    BOX_THING2     = 2,
    BOX_NUM_THING  = BOX_THING2
};
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4  
Sorry, Jonathan. I think, this suggestion is a little "old school" in my mind (kind of convention comes from low-level-c years). This is ok as a quick solution to "embed" some addional infos about the enum but this is not a good practice in larger systems. You should not use an enum if you need info about the number of available values etc. And what about a BOX_NO_THING1? Would you give him BOX_NO_THING+1? Enums should be used as what they are meant to be used for: Specific (int) values represented by "speaking" names. –  Beachwalker Aug 31 '11 at 17:17
    
Hm. You're assuming it's old school because I used all caps, I guess, rather than MicrosoftBumpyCaseWithLongNames. Although I agree it's better to use iterators than loop until reaching an enum'ed XyzNumDefsInMyEnum definition. –  Jonathan Cline IEEE Aug 31 '11 at 21:19

Unless you have a good reason to use the raw values, you should only ever be using implicit values and referencing them with Status.Active and Status.Inactive.

The catch is that you might want to store data in a flat file or DB, or use a flat file or DB that someone else created. If you're making it yourself, make it so the numbering fits what the Enum is used for.

If the data is not yours, of course you're going to want to use whatever the original dev had used as a numbering scheme.

If you're planning on using this enum with an array of some sort, or using it as a boolean toggle, definitely go with a 0-based numbering system.

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I like to start my enums at 0, since that's the default, but I also like to include a Unknown value, with a value of -1. This then becomes the default and can help with debugging sometimes.

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2  
Horrible idea. As a value type, enums are always initialized to zero. If you're going to have some value that represents unknown or uninitialized, it needs to be 0. You can't change the default to -1, zero-filling is hard-coded throughout the CLR. –  Ben Voigt Aug 31 '11 at 13:19
    
Ah, I didn't realise that. I generally set the value of an enum value/property when I decalre/initialise. Thanks for the pointer. –  tomasmcguinness Aug 31 '11 at 13:26

First of all, unless you're specifying specific values for a reason (the numeric value has meaning somewhere else, i.e. The Database or external service) then don't specify numeric values at all and let them be explicit.

Second of all, you should always have a zero value item (in non-flags enums). That element will be used as the default value.

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Don't start them at 0 unless there's a reason to, such as using them as indices to an array or list, or if there's some other practical reason (like using them in bitwise operations).

Your enum should start exactly where it needs to. It needn't be sequential, either. The values, if they are explicitly set, need to reflect some semantic meaning or practical consideration. For example, an enum of "bottles on the wall" should be numbered from 1 to 99, while an enum for powers of 4 should probably start at 4 and continue with 16, 64, 256, etc.

Furthermore, adding a zero-valued element to the enum should only be done if it represents a valid state. Sometimes "none," "unknown," "missing," etc. are valid values, but many times they are not.

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