Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found a link to have a 'switch' tag in Django templates, but I was wondering if this can be somehow achieved without it. Using only the stuff which comes with Django? Basically is there other way then using multiple 'if' or 'ifequal' statements?

Thanks in advance for any tips/suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
+1 Thanks for link, but they say that templates is not for 'programming' and business logic –  Alex Bolotov Aug 9 '09 at 16:50
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, this is not possible with the default Django template engine. You'll have to write something ugly like this to emulate a switch.

{% if a %}
    {{ a }}
{% else %}
    {% if b %}
        {{ b }}
    {% else %}
        {% if c %}
            {{ c }}
        {% else %}
            {{ default }}
        {% endif %}
    {% endif %}
{% endif %}

or if only one if condition can be true and you don't need a default.

{% if a %}
{{ a }}
{% endif %}
{% if b %}
{{ b }}
{% endif %}
{% if c %}
{{ c }}
{% endif %}

Usually, when the template engine is not powerful enough to accomplish what you want this is a sign that the code should be moved into Django view instead of in the template. For example:

# Django view
if a:
  val = a
elif b:
  val = b
elif c:
  val = c
else:
  val = default

# Template
{{ val }}
share|improve this answer
4  
As of Django 1.4, elif is supported –  Jared Forsyth Aug 14 '12 at 18:14
1  
Check out the firstof template filter, which abbreviates this. I'm not sure when it was introduced. –  chris Jan 25 '13 at 9:37
add comment

As of Django 1.4, there is {% elif %}:

{% if a %}
  thing
{% elif b %}
  other thing
{% elif c %}
  another thing
{% endif %} 
share|improve this answer
add comment

To the previous responders: Without understanding the use case, you've made assumptions and criticized the questioner. @Ber says "all over the place" which is certainly not implied by the questioner. Not fair.

I have a case where I would like to do a {%switch%} statement in exactly one place in my Django template. Not only is it not convenient to move the equivalent of the switch statement into Python code, but that would actually make both the view and the template harder to read and take simple conditional logic that belongs in one place and split it into two places.

In many cases where I could imagine a {%switch%} (or an {%if%}) being useful, not using one requires putting HTML in a view. That's a far worse sin and is why {%if%} exists in the first place. {%switch%} is no different.

Fortunately, Django is extensible and multiple people have implemented switch. Check out:

http://www.djangosnippets.org/snippets/967/

share|improve this answer
add comment

In a very general view, the need for a switch statement is a sign that there is a need to create new classes and objects that capture the different "cases".

Then, instead of "swtich"ing all over the place, you only need to call an object method or reference an object attribute and your done.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense in an OOP language, but not in Django template language. You can't / shouldn't "call an object method" for doing rendering in the Django template. –  STALTZ Jul 13 '13 at 11:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.