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I'm trying to use MongoDB to analyse Apache log files. I've created a receipts collection from the Apache access logs. Here's an abridged summary of what my models look like:

db.receipts.findOne()
{
    "_id" : ObjectId("4e57908c7a044a30dc03a888"),
    "path" : "/videos/1/show_invisibles.m4v",
    "issued_at" : ISODate("2011-04-08T00:00:00Z"),
    "status" : "200"
}

I've written a MapReduce function that groups all data by the issued_at date field. It summarizes the total number of requests, and provides a breakdown of the number of requests for each unique path. Here's an example of what the output looks like:

db.daily_hits_by_path.findOne()
{
    "_id" : ISODate("2011-04-08T00:00:00Z"),
    "value" : {
        "count" : 6,
        "paths" : {
            "/videos/1/show_invisibles.m4v" : {
                "count" : 2
            },
            "/videos/1/show_invisibles.ogv" : {
                "count" : 3
            },
            "/videos/6/buffers_listed_and_hidden.ogv" : {
                "count" : 1
            }
        }
    }
}

How can I make the output look like this instead:

{
    "_id" : ISODate("2011-04-08T00:00:00Z"),
    "count" : 6,
    "paths" : {
        "/videos/1/show_invisibles.m4v" : {
            "count" : 2
        },
        "/videos/1/show_invisibles.ogv" : {
            "count" : 3
        },
        "/videos/6/buffers_listed_and_hidden.ogv" : {
            "count" : 1
        }
    }
}
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where you able to do it? If so, how? –  Carlos P Jan 30 at 21:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's not currently possible, but I would suggest voting for this case: https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-2517.

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AFAIK, by design Mongo's map reduce will spit results out in "value tuples" and I haven't seen anything that will configure that "output format". Maybe the finalize() method can be used.

You could try running a post-process that will reshape the data using

results.find({}).forEach( function(result) {
  results.update({_id: result._id}, {count: result.value.count, paths: result.value.paths})
});

Yep, that looks ugly. I know.

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is there not a way to modify the result object/document directly? –  Aidan Feldman Oct 13 '11 at 1:28

You can do Dan's code with a collection reference:

    function clean(collection) { 
      collection.find().forEach( function(result) {
      var value = result.value;
      delete value._id;     
      collection.update({_id: result._id}, value);     
      collection.update({_id: result.id}, {$unset: {value: 1}} ) } )};
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A similar approach to that of @ljonas but no need to hardcode document fields:

db.results.find().forEach( function(result) {
    var value = result.value;
    delete value._id;
    db.results.update({_id: result._id}, value);
    db.results.update({_id: result.id}, {$unset: {value: 1}} )
} );
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Taking the best from previous answers:

db.items.find().forEach(function(item) {
    db.items.update({_id: item._id}, item.value);
});

From http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/core/update/#replace-existing-document-with-new-document
"If the update argument contains only field and value pairs, the update() method replaces the existing document with the document in the update argument, except for the _id field."

So you need neither to $unset value, nor to list each field.

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All the proposed solutions are far from optimal. The fastest you can do so far is something like:

var flattenMRCollection=function(dbName,collectionName) {
    var collection=db.getSiblingDB(dbName)[collectionName];

    var i=0;
    var bulk=collection.initializeUnorderedBulkOp();
    collection.find({ value: { $exists: true } }).addOption(16).forEach(function(result) {
        print((++i));
        //collection.update({_id: result._id},result.value);

        bulk.find({_id: result._id}).replaceOne(result.value);

        if(i%1000==0)
        {
            print("Executing bulk...");
            bulk.execute();
            bulk=collection.initializeUnorderedBulkOp();
        }
    });
    bulk.execute();
};

Then call it: flattenMRCollection("MyDB","MyMRCollection")

This is WAY faster than doing sequential updates.

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NB: this is new in MongoDB 2.6 –  Vincent Aug 11 at 1:26

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