Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've the following scenario

I've an Interface

public interface ImyInterface
{
    void myInterfaceMethod(string param);
}

I've an Abstract Class

public abstract class myAbstractClass
{
    public myAbstractClass()
    {
       //something valid for each inherited class
    }

    public void myAbstractMethod<T>(T param)
    {
      //something with T param
    }
}

I've a class that inherits from myAbstractClass and implements ImyInterface

public class myClass : myAbstractClass, ImyInterface
{
    public myClass():base()
    {}

    public void ThisMethodWillNeverCall()
    {
       // nothing to do
    }                    
}

And, finally, I've a class where I'll create a ImyInterface object. At this point I would call myAbstractMethod, but...

public class myFinalClass
{
    public void myFinalMethod()
    {
       ImyInterface myObj = _myContainer<ImyInterface>();

       myObj.???

    }
}

Obviously there isn't this method because it isn't declared into the interface. My solution is the following

public interface ImyInterface
{
   void myInterfaceMethod(string param);
   void myFakeMethod<T>(T param);
}

public class myClass : myAbstractClass, ImyInterface
{
   public myClass():base()
   {}

   public void ThisMethodWillNeverCall()
   {
      // nothing to do
   }

   //--- a fake method
   public void myFakeMethod<T>(T param)
   {
         base.myAbstractMethod<T>(param);
   }                    
 }

Is there any other solution better than mine?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
1  
why do you think this is a problem? if the method is required by code that uses the interface it should be part of the interface. –  Jason Aug 31 '11 at 14:08
1  
If you're working with interfaces, then obviously the methods need to be declared on them. –  dlev Aug 31 '11 at 14:08
    
Ditch the interface, use the abstract class. –  Will Aug 31 '11 at 14:11
    
Just a note but void myAbstractMethod() is not abstract. This distracts and confuses the reader. Maybe the writer too. –  Henk Holterman Aug 31 '11 at 14:11
    
@Jason: it's not a real problem, but maybe is there solution better than mine –  Faber Aug 31 '11 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, your naming convention is a mess. Read up on the guidelines that Microsoft have made.

It's also hard to tell what you are trying to achieve based on your example.

Back to your question:

You should only access an interface to work with that interface. Don't try to make any magic stuff with classes/interfaces to get them working together. That usually means that the class shouldn't try to implement the interface.

It's better that you create a new interface which have the features that you want and let your class implement both.

share|improve this answer
    
It's an example, I've tried to write as simple as possible. Thank you, I'll create a new interface as you suggest. –  Faber Aug 31 '11 at 14:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.