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I'm working an a ASP.NET application (not using MVC) and need a User-Role-Permission based authorization scheeme, where pages and/or methods can demand the specific permission they require (instead of which role the user has). Is there a way to extend Forms Authentication (or building something) to solve this?

If possible I would like to be able to use attributes:

[RequirePermission("UserEdit")]
public partial class EditUser : System.Web.UI.Page
{
}

Perhaps even for methods:

public class MyClass
{
    ...
    [RequirePermission("UserEdit")]
    public void Save()
    {
        ...
    }
}

Is this possible?

I found this page, that suggested using Roles for permissions:

[Authorize(Roles = "UserEdit")]
public partial class EditUser : System.Web.UI.Page
{
}

I am not very fond of this solution, but that would also be a possible way to solve things, but what do I need to do to get it working?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I see the difference between what you're looking for and what the AuthorizeAttribute already provides. What don't you like about AuthorizeAttribute? –  kenwarner Aug 31 '11 at 14:33
    
@qntmfred: Roles based authorization is not Permission based authorization. Microsoft simplified everything to Roles based authorization in their IPrincipal model...but this is widely acknowledged as terrible design on their part. The ideal model includes Users, Roles, AND Permissions. Users are in Roles. Roles have sets of Permissions. –  Jeff Aug 31 '11 at 14:39
    
like Rocky (and you as well) said though...if you consider that IsInRole() can be thought of as "HasPermission()", then there's a solution. When you load the .NET principal with a list of "roles", you really load it with a list of permissions. So when your application asks "IsInRole()", it does it like this: bool result = currentPrincipal.IsInRole(requiredPermission); you can still use AuthorizeAttribute to make this work –  kenwarner Aug 31 '11 at 15:06
1  
Exactly...but the key point is that YOUR internal model should differentiate between roles and permissions, even if the IPrincipal API does not... –  Jeff Sep 1 '11 at 22:07
    
The idea is good. I have no problems building the database and figure the logic out, but I'm rather new to Forms authentication, so I don't know where to put my code... Could you give me some hints there? –  Hunterwood Sep 2 '11 at 6:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Microsoft's authorization model sucks...and it's widely acknowledged http://lostechies.com/derickbailey/2011/05/24/dont-do-role-based-authorization-checks-do-activity-based-checks/).

That said. It's nice to have cross compatibility by fitting into their IPrincipal.IsInRole API (and thus being able to leverage the Authorize attribute)

So...what I do to compromise is have a full permission model in the DB with Users, Roles, and Permissions...but when my code sets the CurrentPrincipal I flatten the User's Roles and Permissions into the Roles collection of the IPrincipal. It's far from ideal...but IMHO it's a decent compromise. Others (Rockford Lhotka) have also taken this approach: http://www.lhotka.net/weblog/PermissionbasedAuthorizationVsRolebasedAuthorization.aspx

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What would be the best way to solve it? Extend IPrincipal? Change the Stored Procedures? (I don't know why, but currently I cant even use the [Authorize] attribute, even thoug we are using forms authentication)... –  Hunterwood Sep 1 '11 at 10:21
    
I personally do...but that's not necessary. The thing that's necessary is your code that CREATES the IPrincipal know to flatten your role/permission model into the IPrincipal's roles. –  Jeff Sep 1 '11 at 22:07

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