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I have JavaScript that basically looks like the following

function a() {
    b(1);
}

function b(myNumber) {
    c(myNumber);
}

function c(myNumber) {
    var calculation = 5 * (myNumber - 1);
    alert(calculation);
}

When I call the function a(), the alert box ends up saying "NaN". Why is this happening? I've tried using the parseInt() function in a number of places, but nothing seems to work.

EDIT

Full code (what's actually being done rather than a stripped down example):

function updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId) {
    updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId, 1);
}

function updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId, pageNumber) {
    var table = document.getElementById(tableId);
    var rowsPerPageSelect = document.getElementById(rowsPerPageSelectId);
    var rowsPerPage = rowsPerPageSelect.options[rowsPerPageSelect.selectedIndex].text;

    updateTable(table, rowsPerPage, pageNumber);
    //updateTablePageLinks();
}

function updateTable(table, rowsPerPage, pageNumber) {
    var tableRows = table.getElementsByTagName("tr");
    var totalNumberOfRows = tableRows.length;

    var startRow = rowsPerPage * (pageNumber - 1);      
     var endRow = Math.min(startRow + rowsPerPage, totalNumberOfRows - 1);

    alert("Start: " + startRow + "\nEnd: " + endRow);
}

A select box has an onchange calling updateTablePagination('myTableId', 'rowsPerPage'). The ids are both correct.

"Start" and "End" are both NaN.

Edit 2

Alternatively, if I just do alert(pageNumber), it is undefined.

Simplified

Even this says pageNumber is undefined:

function updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId) {
    updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId, 1);
}

function updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId, pageNumber) {
    alert(pageNumber);
}
share|improve this question
4  
I just tested and I get 0. jsfiddle.net/loktar/pqsVt – Loktar Aug 31 '11 at 15:24
    
I get 0 on Chrome. What browser? – pimvdb Aug 31 '11 at 15:24
    
There's nothing wrong with the example you've posted. You need to post the rest of your code. – Andy E Aug 31 '11 at 15:25
    
We will need to see the actual code. The error doesn't happen in the code you posted above. – coderjoe Aug 31 '11 at 15:25
    
For me on the latest FF it alerts 0. – bbg Aug 31 '11 at 15:25
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have two functions called updateTablePagination. Javascript does not support function overloading. Get rid of the first declaration, because it is getting overwritten with the second. You can use the || to define a default value for the parameter.

function updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId, pageNumber) {
    pageNumber = pageNumber || 1; //Set a default value for pageNumber
    var table = document.getElementById(tableId);
    var rowsPerPageSelect = document.getElementById(rowsPerPageSelectId);
    var rowsPerPage = rowsPerPageSelect.options[rowsPerPageSelect.selectedIndex].text;

    updateTable(table, rowsPerPage, pageNumber);
    //updateTablePageLinks();
}


updateTablePagination(tableId, rowsPerPageSelectId) //Will call the function with pageNumber == 1
share|improve this answer
    
How does the || work in this case? – Rachel G. Aug 31 '11 at 15:41
    
For example, x will either be blank or an integer. How does || work with integer comparison? – Rachel G. Aug 31 '11 at 15:42
    
pageNumber || 1 will return pageNumber if it is defined, and 1 otherwise. Here is a really simple jsfiddle: jsfiddle.net/asYBp – Dennis Aug 31 '11 at 15:43
    
+1. Thanks for the help. – Rachel G. Aug 31 '11 at 15:45
1  
Dennis's description of || is almost correct. It doesn't return pageNumber if pageNumber is defined, and the nubmer 1 otherwise. It will return pageNumber if the value is "truish". This means if it's an integer value it will not do what you expect for the value 0. – coderjoe Aug 31 '11 at 17:04

The problem is that you're overwriting functions. With this:

function a() {
    a(1)
}

function a(x) {
    alert(x);
}

calling a will always call the second (overwritten) function and thus x is always undefined. You want something like overloading. Best thing to do in that case is using the || operator for a default value:

function a(x) {
    var x = x || 1; // x if x is given, otherwise 1
    alert(x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
How does the || work in this case? – Rachel G. Aug 31 '11 at 15:41
    
@Rachel G.: Usually you use it for booleans. || returns the left-side thing if it's 'truthy' and otherwise it returns the right-side thing. true is truthy and false is falsy so it works for booleans. Since some other values are falsy as well (undefined for example), doing undefined || 1 will return 1. – pimvdb Aug 31 '11 at 15:42
    
For example, x will either be blank or an integer. How does || work with integer comparison? – Rachel G. Aug 31 '11 at 15:42
    
Are all non-0 ints true? – Rachel G. Aug 31 '11 at 15:43
    
@Rachel G.: Falsy values are 0, "", undefined, null, NaN and false; truthy is everything else. – pimvdb Aug 31 '11 at 15:43

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