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I want to extract the return type of a function. Problem is, there are other functions with the same name but different signature, and I can not get C++ to select the appropriate one. I know about std::result_of, but from a few tries I have concluded it suffers from the same problem as well. I have heard about a solution involving decltype as well, but I do not know any specifics.

At the moment I am using template metaprogramming to extract the return type from a function pointer type, which works fine for a limited number of parameters (any non-limited solution?), given that extraction of function pointer type works for unambiguous functions.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

//  ----

#define resultof(x)     typename ResultOf<typeof(x)>::Type  //  might need a & before x

template <class T>
class ResultOf
{
    public:
        typedef void Type;      //  might need to be T instead of void; see below
};

template <class R>
class ResultOf<R (*) ()>
{
    public:
        typedef R Type;
};

template <class R, class P>
class ResultOf<R (*) (P)>
{
    public:
        typedef R Type;
};

//  ----

class NoDefaultConstructor
{
    public:
        NoDefaultConstructor (int) {}
};


int f ();
int f ()
{
    cout << "f" << endl;
    return 1;
}

double f (int x);
double f (int x)
{
    cout << "f(int)" << endl;
    return x + 2.0;
}

bool f (NoDefaultConstructor);
bool f (NoDefaultConstructor)
{
    cout << "f(const NoDefaultConstructor)" << endl;
    return false;
}

int g ();
int g ()
{
    cout << "g" << endl;
    return 4;
}

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    if(argc||argv){}

//  this works since there is no ambiguity. does not work without &
//  resultof(&g) x0 = 1;
//  cout << x0 << endl;

//  does not work since type of f is unknown due to ambiguity. same thing without &
//  resultof(&f) x1 = 1;
//  cout << x1 << endl;

//  does not work since typeof(f()) is int, not a member function pointer; we COULD use T instead of void in the unspecialized class template to make it work. same thing with &
//  resultof(f()) x2 = 1;
//  cout << x2 << endl;

//  does not work per above, and compiler thinks differently from a human about f(int); no idea how to make it correct
//  resultof(f(int)) x3 = 1;
//  cout << x3 << endl;

//  does not work per case 2
//  resultof(f(int())) x4 = 1;
//  cout << x4 << endl;

//  does not work per case 2, and due to the lack of a default constructor
//  resultof(f(NoDefaultConstructor())) x5 = 1;
//  cout << x5 << endl;

//  this works but it does not solve the problem, we need to extract return type from a particular function, not a function type
//  resultof(int(*)(int)) x6 = 1;
//  cout << x6 << endl;

}

Any idea what syntax feature am I missing and how to fix it, preferably with a solution that works in a simple way, e.g. resultof(f(int))?

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2  
What problem are you trying to solve? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 31 '11 at 17:05
    
Well, it is a bit unconventional. I am trying to create a pointer wrapper template, ref<T>, which provides proxies for operators on the underlying class, so it behaves (kinda) like the class. For example, if a String class has a String operator + (const String& obj) operator, I want ref<String> to have a String operator + (const String& obj) operator as well. The deduction of the (limited number of) parameters is already solved since it is a simple template, but the deduction of the return type is problematic. –  Frigo Aug 31 '11 at 17:14
2  
If you're using C++11, std::ref does that already. It provides an operator(Args...) that a reference to a function (or function object) will be relayed properly. It also has an implicit conversion to a reference to T. If you're not, I would look at boost::result_of, and see how it works. –  Dave S Aug 31 '11 at 17:17
    
Have you tried boost::type_traits along with boost::remove_pointer? boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/libs/type_traits/doc/html/… –  Tom Kerr Aug 31 '11 at 17:21
    
@Dave I am going to check out std::ref, it sounds like exactly what I want, proxy operators and implicit conversions. At the very least I could get some ideas to implement my own. –  Frigo Aug 31 '11 at 17:29
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think that this can be done with decltype and declval:

For example: decltype(f(std::declval<T>())).

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What if you don't want to call it? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 31 '11 at 17:12
1  
Well, it doesn't seem to call it, but it still does not work if the type of the parameter has no default constructor. –  Frigo Aug 31 '11 at 17:16
1  
This doesn't really solve the problem though, because it still requires a default-constructor... –  Mankarse Aug 31 '11 at 17:16
2  
@Tomalak: the operand of the decltype specifier is an unevaluated operand (7.1.6.2/4). –  Steve Jessop Aug 31 '11 at 17:17
9  
@Frigo @Mankarse declval (in <utility>) solves that issue. If your compiler doesn't have it, you can do it yourself template <typename T> typename std::add_rvalue_reference<T>::type declval() noexcept;. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 31 '11 at 17:20
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It's very hard to inspect an overloaded function name without arguments. You can inspect the return types for overloads that differ in arity -- provided that no arity has more than one overload. Even then, turning a hard error (if/when a given arity does have more than one overload) into SFINAE is a pain as it requires writing a trait just for that particular function(!) since overloaded function names can't be passed as any kind of argument. Might as well require user code to use an explicit specialization...

template<typename R>
R
inspect_nullary(R (*)());

template<typename R, typename A0>
R
inspect_unary(R (*)(A0));

int f();
void f(int);

int g();
double g();

typedef decltype(inspect_nullary(f)) nullary_return_type;
typedef decltype(inspect_unary(f)) unary_return_type;

static_assert( std::is_same<nullary_return_type, int>::value, "" );
static_assert( std::is_same<unary_return_type, void>::value, "" );

// hard error: ambiguously overloaded name
// typedef decltype(inspect_nullary(g)) oops;

Given that you're using C++0x, I feel the need to point out that there is (IMO) never a need to inspect a return type beyond typename std::result_of<Functor(Args...)>::type, and that doesn't apply to function names; but perhaps your interest in this is purely academical.

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Okay, after a few attempts I managed to work around the std::declval method suggested by Mankarse. I used a variadic class template to fixate the parameters, and used the template deduction of functions to get the return value from a function pointer. Its current syntax is typeof(ResultOf<parameters>::get(function)), unfortunately it is still far from the desired resultof<parameters>(function) form. Will edit this answer if I find a way to further simplify it.

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

using namespace std;

template <class... Args>
class ResultOf
{
    public:
        template <class R>
        static R get (R (*) (Args...));
        template <class R, class C>
        static R get (R (C::*) (Args...));
};

class NoDefaultConstructor
{
    public:
        NoDefaultConstructor (int) {}
};

int f ();
double f (int x);
bool f (NoDefaultConstructor);
int f (int x, int y);


int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    if(argc||argv){}

    cout << typeid(typeof(ResultOf<>::get(f))).name() << endl;
    cout << typeid(typeof(ResultOf<int>::get(f))).name() << endl;
    cout << typeid(typeof(ResultOf<NoDefaultConstructor>::get(f))).name() << endl;
    cout << typeid(typeof(ResultOf<int, int>::get(f))).name() << endl;

    typeof(ResultOf<int>::get(f)) d = 1.1;
    cout << d << endl;
}

Edit:

Managed to solve it with variadic macros, the syntax is now resultof(f, param1, param2, etc). Without them I couldn't pass the commas between the parameter types to the template. Tried with the syntax resultof(f, (param1, param2, etc)) to no avail.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <class... Args>
class Param
{
    public:
        template <class R>
        static R Func (R (*) (Args...));
        template <class R, class C>
        static R Func (R (C::*) (Args...));
};

#define resultof(f, ...) typeof(Param<__VA_ARGS__>::Func(f))

int f ();
double f (int x);
int f (int x, int y);

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    resultof(f, int) d = 1.1;
    cout << d << endl;
}
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God damnit, I can not make it SFINAE compatible. Any idea how to prevent errors when the function does not exist? –  Frigo Sep 1 '11 at 15:44
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